The movie, “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword,” opens Friday. We saw a preview of it last week in Manhattan.

It starts with a boy named Arthur as a young child. His dad, King Uther Pendragon, is challenged by his brother Vortigern (Arthur’s uncle, played by Jude Law), who wants control of the throne. The king loses the fight, and right before he dies, he throws his sword, Excalibur, up and it lands on his back, turning him into the stone that the sword gets stuck in.

Arthur escapes in a small boat and ends up somewhere else. He is taken in by strangers and is raised by many different people. Eventually, he ends up in a school that teaches fighting, like martial arts. Adult Arthur (played by Charlie Hunnam) learns to fight there and grows stronger. Many people try pulling Excalibur out from the stone to see if they are the king’s heir, but fail. Arthur is able to pull the sword out, and the sword reaches its full potential only when he uses it. The story is about how Arthur got his revenge after his father and mother were killed.

It teaches people never to give up. The very well-developed plot makes it a great movie. We think it should be for those 12 and older because of language and intense scenes.

After the movie, we met Charlie Hunnam and director Guy Ritchie. We each asked them a couple of questions.

“What was it like working with an incredible actor like Charlie?” we asked Guy. “Disappointing. No, kidding!” he said. “The reason Charlie was chosen for this role was because Charlie and I met for a cup of tea, and from that I knew Charlie was right for the role. And that was because Charlie and I shared the same frequency. I could start a sentence, and he could finish the sentence. The whole process was like that, so it was pretty easy for the both of us.”

We asked Guy if it hard directing a movie with a lot of special effects. Guy said, “Yes. There are three parts to this movie. One part is special effects, and that takes as much time as the other two parts. The next part is shooting the movie. The third part is the music, and they all take as much time as one another. This was supposed to come out a year ago, so we had another year to work on all the visual effects. So we are a bit lucky, in a sense, because you would have had the same movie a year ago but a year’s less work on the visual effects.”

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We asked Charlie if he preferred acting in movies or in TV shows. “Both have their plusses and minuses,” he said. “The style of Guy’s filmmaking is shooting almost in real time, and it feels like a TV show because Guy tends to like to work very, very quickly, which is how TV shows are made. I did a TV show for many years, and we would shoot an episode in seven days. I like to work quickly. So, usually television, but I really enjoyed working with Guy.”

We asked Charlie, if he could live his life as any movie character, which one would he choose? Charlie answered, “Probably King Arthur, because there is so much more of the story to tell.”

Finally we asked Guy what inspired the movie’s sets. Guy said, “I got my inspiration from the movies I have watched and directed.”

This movie was really good, and everyone has a favorite part. But one we liked a lot was a montage of Arthur as he was getting older, earning money, and training to get stronger. In the montage, he is taught discipline. This movie was great, and we rate it 4.5 out of 5.