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"The Grimm Conclusion," Adam Gidwitz, ages 10 and older

The adventures of brother and sister duo Jorinda and Joringel conclude in author Adam Gidwitz's third book of their creepy, fairy-tale inspired series, "The Grimm Conclusion" (Penguin, $16.99). The tome comes out Oct. 8, just in time for Halloween, and follows up "A Tale Dark & Grimm" and "In a Glass Grimmly."

New books for kids 8 and older

Here are four new reads for kids ages 8 and older. -- Compiled by Beth Whitehouse

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"Heaven is Paved With Oreos," Catherine Gilbert Murdock, ages 10 and older

Elizabeth Gilbert, who wrote the blockbuster "Eat, Pray, Love," has a sister who is also a writer. Catherine Gilbert Murdock's new book, "Heaven Is Paved With Oreos" (Houghton Mifflin, $16.99), is out next week. Sarah Zorn and her best friend, Curtis, decide to solve the constant teasing that they're dating by "fake" dating. Then, things get complicated.

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"Flora & Ulysses," Kate DiCamillo, ages 8 and older

Bestselling children's author and Newbery Award winner Kate DiCamillo -- whose books include "The Tale of Despereaux" and "Because of Winn-Dixie" -- has penned "Flora & Ulysses" (Candlewick Press, $17.99), released this week. The story begins when a squirrel named Ulysses is hit by a vacuum cleaner and born anew as a superhero with powers of strength and flight.

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"The Grimm Conclusion," Adam Gidwitz, ages 10 and older

The adventures of brother and sister duo Jorinda and Joringel conclude in author Adam Gidwitz's third book of their creepy, fairy-tale inspired series, "The Grimm Conclusion" (Penguin, $16.99). The tome comes out Oct. 8, just in time for Halloween, and follows up "A Tale Dark & Grimm" and "In a Glass Grimmly."

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"Fallout," Todd Strasser, ages 10 and older

Prolific children's-young adult writer Todd Strasser's 100th novel, "Fallout" (Candlewick Press, $16.99), released this month, is set on Long Island. Strasser grew up in Roslyn Heights. Protagonist Scott's father builds the only bomb shelter in the neighborhood as the Cold War heats up in 1962.

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