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Tabbethia Haubold-Magee, co-owner of the Long Island Livestock (Credit: The Long Island Livestock Company)

Tabbethia Haubold-Magee, co-owner of the Long Island Livestock Company in Yaphank shears one of the llamas on her farm. A professional shearer, she also sells the raw fleece and fiber. (2013)

Raw food, unprocessed goods on Long Island

Some like it raw -- locally grown wheat and hops, fresh whole cow's milk, fleece and fiber straight off the backs of the animals. Farmers are selling these and other unprocessed goods to Long Islanders who want products closer to the source, closer to their original form.

These are just a few of the Jersey
(Credit: Chris Wines)

These are just a few of the Jersey cows being miled by Chris Wines of Ty Llwyd Farm in Riverhead. Wines says they get more than 25 gallons of milk a day, which they sell in half-gallon glass bottles. (Undated)

Tabbethia Haubold-Magee, co-owner of the Long Island Livestock
(Credit: The Long Island Livestock Company)

Tabbethia Haubold-Magee, co-owner of the Long Island Livestock Company in Yaphank, show off the intact fleece from one of the sheep she shears. Haubold-Magee, a professional shearer, travels up and down the East Coast shearing sheep, llamas, alpacas and goats. (2013)

Tabbethia Haubold-Magee, co-owner of the Long Island Livestock
(Credit: The Long Island Livestock Company)

Tabbethia Haubold-Magee, co-owner of the Long Island Livestock Company in Yaphank shears one of the llamas on her farm. A professional shearer, she also sells the raw fleece and fiber. (2013)

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These are just a few of the Jersey
(Credit: Chris Wines)

These are just a few of the Jersey cows being milked by Chris Wines of Ty Llwyd Farm in Riverhead. Wines says they get more than 25 gallons of milk a day, which they sell in half-gallon glass bottles. (Undated)

Farm to Pint in Peconic grows four different
(Credit: Andrew Tralka)

Farm to Pint in Peconic grows four different types of hops, all of which are sold to local breweries or to individuals. (2013)

Farm to Pint, owned by Andrew Tralka and
(Credit: Andrew Tralka)

Farm to Pint, owned by Andrew Tralka and Jaclyn Van Bourgondien, has been growing hops for two years. In the spring, they also offer hop plant kits for sale. (2013)

Here are a few of the Jersey cows
(Credit: Chris Wines)

Here are a few of the Jersey cows being milked by Chris Wines of Ty Llwyd Farm in Riverhead. Wines says the farm gets more than 25 gallons of milk a day, which is sold in half-gallon glass bottles. (Undated)

Hops grow vertically on a large stake that
(Credit: Condzella Hops)

Hops grow vertically on a large stake that can be up to 22 feet tall. (2013)

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John Condzella, 27, a local hops farmer from
(Credit: Daniel Brennan)

John Condzella, 27, a local hops farmer from Wading River, adds his fresh cascade hops to a brew that will become "Wet Hop Harbor Ale" at the Greenport Harbor Brewing Co. in Greenport. (Aug. 22, 2013)

When the hops are added to the beer
(Credit: Daniel Brennan)

When the hops are added to the beer brewing process determines how they'll enhance the finished product. Add them early and they affect the bitterness; Add them at the end and they enhance the taste and aroma. (Aug. 22, 2013)

Fresh hops, also known as wet hops, are
(Credit: Daniel Brennan)

Fresh hops, also known as wet hops, are generally added in at the end of the brewing process. (Aug. 22, 2013)

Hops like sunshine and need a large stake
(Credit: Condzella Hops)

Hops like sunshine and need a large stake to support the vines, which can grow to nearly 20 feet. (2013)

Hops can be as tiny as berries or
(Credit: Daniel Brennan)

Hops can be as tiny as berries or as large as a foot long. Different varieties of hops offer different flavors, including spicy and citrusy. (Aug. 22, 2013)

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John Condzella of Condzella Hops in Wading River
(Credit: Condzella Hops handout)

John Condzella of Condzella Hops in Wading River shows off some freshly harvested hop vines. Hops can be harvested either by hand or using a Wolf, a German-made picker. (2013)

John Condzella of Condzella Hops in Wading River
(Credit: Condzella Hops )

John Condzella of Condzella Hops in Wading River imported this Wolf, a German-made hop picking machine to help with harvesting, which also can be done by hand. (2013)

Hops can be added either at the beginning
(Credit: Condzella Hops)

Hops can be added either at the beginning of the beer brewing process to enhance bitterness, or at the end for aroma and flavor. (2013)

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