Part design guide, part memoir by a journalist who blazed a career path understanding “the power of making life pretty,” “The Bee Cottage Story: How I Made a Muddle of Things and Decorated My Way Back to Happiness” (Skyhorse, $24.99), highlights how doing what you love is a key tool in rebuilding your life.

East Hampton’s Frances Schultz, a contributing editor to House Beautiful and former editor-at-large for Veranda, compiles life lessons from her efforts to rebuild her life — and the rundown Bee Cottage on Fithian Lane — after a broken engagement, cancer and a series of additional losses set her back on her heels.

Arranged in crisp chapters with plenty of wit and humor, Schultz leads with her life story and shares her design know-how in the latter stages. Look for a drawing by Robert Dash, chairs from Sylvester & Co. in Amangansett, a hanging metal chalkboard from the General Home Store in East Hampton, a lamp from Sag Harbor’s Ruby Beets and the original landscape plan as devised by Jane Lappin of Wainscott Farms, all sprinkled throughout the pages.

Thirty designers provide an intimate look at the history of the interior design firm commissioned by the Kennedys, the Astors and the Rockefellers — just to name a few — in “Parish-Hadley Tree of Life: An Intimate History of the Legendary Design Firm” (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, $60).

The firm’s heyday came in the 1960s and lasted until the 1990s, when it made an impact on Long Island, designing for the Whitney family’s estate, Greentree, as well as numerous Hamptons homes, several of which are featured in these pages.

Co-author Bunny Williams, a garden expert and interior designer who was at Parish-Hadley for 20 years, says founders Sister Parish and Albert Hadley “came at it from different ways. But it was the combination that made it magic.” Williams is joined by Brian McCarthy, a former partner at Parish-Hadley whose work has appeared in an array of prestigious publications.

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The works of an acclaimed husband-and-wife interior design team are showcased in “Carrier and Company: Positively Chic Interiors” (The Vendome Press, $60). Authors Jesse Carrier and Mara Miller met in their senior year of FIT and worked together at a number of top firms before launching their own in 2005.

In naming them to the AD 100 in 2014, Architectural Digest says the “spirited, winning nature of this Manhattan-based couple, who in less than a decade have attracted the attention — and business — of fashion and media heavyweights” such as Vogue editor Anna Wintour, who provides the foreword.

The design showcase displays their prowess in about 200 full-color photographs, including making “a new version of an old American house” at a client’s Hamptons home and turning another converted Hamptons barn into the “ultimate under-the-eaves retreat.”

You’ll also see the designs of numerous Long Island architects, builders, painters, restorers and shop owners featured throughout the book.

See how artists create spaces that reflect and inspire their vision in “Artists Living With Art” (Abrams, $60). Written by journalists Stacey Goergen, an independent curator, and Amanda Benchley, an independent filmmaker, they use original interviews with 25 artists and more than 200 photographs by veteran fashion and interior shutterbug Oberto Gili to link their personal tastes to their creative process.

The book also provides an exclusive look at the art collections accumulated by some of today’s most prominent contemporary artists.

The tropical design vernacular of one of Florida’s most exclusive addresses is in the spotlight in “Palm Beach Chic” (The Vendome Press, $75). Written by Veranda contributor Jennifer Ash Rudick, the book features more than 400 color photographs by interior design photographer Jessica Klewicki Glynn, whose parents owned La Renaissance Country Club in Roslyn and is an Old Westbury native who took her first photography classes as a student at The Wheatley School.

Rudick, a longtime Palm Beach resident, takes readers on an insider’s tour of 25 residences, ranging from Mediterranean Revivals to a Moorish casbah to villas, ranches and vintage condos, highlighting the interior design and grounds alike. Rudick says the homes are “testaments to what can be achieved when inspired by the natural beauty of a unique locale and when imagination is one’s only limitation.” One of the featured homes is that of decorator Meg Braff, who has a shop in Locust Valley.