Front-yard vegetable gardens

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Street-side vegetable gardens are taking root all over Long Island.

The sunny area of Tom and Barbara Bolen's
(Credit: Dylan Licopoli)

The sunny area of Tom and Barbara Bolen's front yard in Northport makes an ideal location for a vegetable garden. (July 2011)

Compost and topsoil are ready for planting in
(Credit: Dylan Licopoli)

Compost and topsoil are ready for planting in raised bed in the front yard of Devin McGrath and Abby Bartig in Northport. (April 2011)

Devin McGrath and Abby Bartig stand in front
(Credit: Newsday / Rebecca Cooney)

Devin McGrath and Abby Bartig stand in front of their Northport home, framed by their vegetable garden that occupies almost the entire front yard. (Aug. 3, 2011)

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Zhang Jun De picks tomatoes from his front-yard
(Credit: Newsday / Rebecca Cooney)

Zhang Jun De picks tomatoes from his front-yard garden in East Meadow. For the most part, the space is planted with Chinese vegetables that are not available in local stores. (Aug. 3, 2011)

Zhang Jun De waters his front-yard garden in
(Credit: Newsday / Rebecca Cooney)

Zhang Jun De waters his front-yard garden in East Meadow. (Aug. 3, 2011)

A type of Chinese squash hangs in the
(Credit: Newsday / Rebecca Cooney)

A type of Chinese squash hangs in the front-yard garden of Zhang Jun De of East Meadow. He plants it each year from seeds saved from the previous year. (Aug. 3, 2011)

Rosa Patterson grows a large tomato garden in
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

Rosa Patterson grows a large tomato garden in her Ronkonkoma front yard every year. (July 28, 2011)

Kayla Wilson, 2, has an oops moment with
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

Kayla Wilson, 2, has an oops moment with a bowl of tomatoes picked from a front-yard patch at her grandmother's Ronkonkoma home. (July 28, 2011)

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Kayla Wilson points to a tomato she wants
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

Kayla Wilson points to a tomato she wants to pick. Her grandmother, Rosa Patterson, grows vegetables every year around her Ronkonkoma yard, both front and back. (July 28, 2011)

Kayla Wilson and her grandmother Rosa Patterson pick
(Credit: Photo by Steve Pfost)

Kayla Wilson and her grandmother Rosa Patterson pick a tomato from Patterson's front-yard garden in Ronkonkoma. (July 28, 2011)

Rosa Patterson gives her granddaughter a tomato from
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

Rosa Patterson gives her granddaughter a tomato from the front-yard garden. Patterson grows everything from strawberries to lettuce and tomatoes in small patches around her yard in Ronkonkoma. A tomato garden sprouts in her front yard every year. (July 28, 2011)

Kayla Wilson eats a fresh tomato grown in
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

Kayla Wilson eats a fresh tomato grown in her grandmother's front-yard garden in Ronkonkoma. (July 28, 2011)

Homeowner Eric Gilmore, right, stands with gardeners Jesse
(Credit: Kate Gilmore )

Homeowner Eric Gilmore, right, stands with gardeners Jesse Curran and Dylan Licopoli after building a front-yard garden for produce. Licopoli is a Northport landscaper who designs and plants front-yard gardens. (June 2011)

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Kate and Eric Gilmore harvest basil, peppers and
(Credit: Newsday / Rebecca Cooney)

Kate and Eric Gilmore harvest basil, peppers and a few cherry tomatoes from their front-yard garden in Northport. (Aug. 3, 2011)

Kate and Eric Gilmore harvest basil, peppers and
(Credit: Newsday / Rebecca Cooney)

Kate and Eric Gilmore harvest basil, peppers and a few cherry tomatoes in their front yard in Northport. (Aug. 3, 2011)

Kate and Eric Gilmore harvest basil, peppers, cucumbers,
(Credit: Newsday / Rebecca Cooney)

Kate and Eric Gilmore harvest basil, peppers, cucumbers, jalapenos, a carrot and a few cherry tomatoes from their front-yard garden in Northport. (Aug. 3, 2011)

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