My garden is buried under snow today, and that's not a bad thing. Snow is a great insulator, serving as a frozen mulch of sorts that keeps the ground temperature from fluctuating. Without it, bulbs and crowns of dormant perennials (shrubs, too) would be more likely to heave out of the ground with the constant freeze-thaw cycles that prevail throughout the season.

Yesterday, my evergreens were collapsing under the weight of all that snow, so I called my kids from work and told them to go out there and knock the snow off the branches with brooms. They went out, but did the job with their hands, and I came home to a mudroom and bathroom strewn with gloves, hats, coats and wet boots; but the trees had recovered nicely. This week, Long Island isn't the only region reeling from snow.

A weather forecaster in Oklahoma has predicted an unusual, maybe unprecedented event: Simultaneous snow on the ground in every state in the country. A winter storm working its way through the Deep South today is expected to leave an accumulation of snow on the ground throughout the region, including in the Florida panhandle, according to Patrick Marsh of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Severe Storms Laboratory.

Add to that the recent snowfalls in places like Texas, California and the entire Eastern Seaboard, and it could be history in the making. Marsh, who's trying to collect photos of snow on the ground from all 50 states, said he's not sure whether this has happened before.

With more snow predicted for Monday on Long Island, we're holding up our end of the bargain.

-- With AP

MORE: Share photos of snow in your neck of the woods this week

MORE: February garden chore calendar

MORE: How to prune trees and shrubs

PHOTOS: Snowstorm photos from around LI | Classic LI snowstorms, 1947-2009 | Animals in the snow!

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Photo: A family builds a snowman in South Fort Worth, Texas, after a snowstorm blanketed parts of the state Thursday. (AP Photo / Feb. 11, 2010)