Thanksgiving is a time where friends, family, and pets gather together and give thanks for all their blessings. The holiday also involves plenty of delicious food that, although enjoyable for us, can cause serious health risks for our four-legged family members. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals offers pet owners tips on having a healthy and happy Thanksgiving with their furry companions.

Turkey                                                      

Make sure the turkey is boneless and well-cooked before treating your pup. Raw or uncooked turkey may contain salmonella bacteria and bones that can be a dangerous choking hazard. The ASPCA suggests treating your pets with a drizzle of gravy, and adding tiny bits of turkey, sweet potatoes and green beans to their regular dinner routine.  To keep your pets occupied during your Thanksgiving festivities, add some treats to a puzzle toy which will keep them content while you prepare for your guests.

Ingredients used in certain recipes

Keep your pets away from sage and other herbs used in Thanksgiving dishes like stuffing recipes because some contain essential oils that can cause gastrointestinal issues and nervous system depression in pets, especially cats.

Bread dough

advertisement | advertise on newsday

The ASPCA warns owners about spoiling their pets with raw bread dough this holiday. According to the ASPCA, “the yeast continues to convert the sugars in the dough to carbon dioxide gas and alcohol. This can result in bloated drunken pets, which could become a life-threatening emergency, requiring hospitalization.”

Cake Batter

Make sure to keep pets away from cake batter. Cake batter containing raw eggs can cause salmonella bacteria which can lead to food poisoning.

Make sure to take out the trash 

Preparing Thanksgiving dinner can be hectic, and while you're preparing for guests, your pets may be roaming around the kitchen looking for left-over food. Make sure to empty out the trash throughout the day. Your garbage likely will contain chocolate, bones or onions, which can be hazardous to your pet’s health.