They’ll provide the model — just bring your art supplies.

That’s the draw phrase at the Art Guild of Port Washington, which hosts a “Sip and Sketch” live model sketching night on the second Thursday of every month.

Unlike the already-popular “paint and sip nights,” there are no instructors at these sketching classes, which cost $15. The attendees are merely brushing up on their skills — in some cases literally — while they socialize. BYOB is encouraged.

“We’re all artists, in one way, shape or form,” says Jill Gleischer, of Bayville, a retired fashion illustrator.

On these evenings, artists like Gleischer, who prefers to draw in water color or pencil, will sketch a live model — sometimes nude — in a variety of timed poses.

“I find it very relaxing. It’s almost like you are meditating,” Gleischer says. “If you have any problems, it just goes out of your head.”

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UNWIND AND WORK

This is exactly the atmosphere that Susan Herbst, of Bayville, and Diane Bares, who lives in Port Washington, hoped to create when they launched the series in September. Bares is executive director of the guild and Herbst, an associate.

“There’s something very cathartic about putting pen to paper,” Bares says.

The women say they were familiar with the concept of the paint-and-sip evenings that have gained popularity throughout New York but wanted to provide an outlet for established artists looking to broaden their creative experiences.

“There are hardly any places that do this on Long Island,” Herbst says. “So we thought, why not just do it here?”

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Unlike other craft nights where an entire class will tackle the same project, no drawings at their Sip and Sketch events are ever the same.

WHAT TO EXPECT

The models vary month to month and are as important to the sketch as the supplies. The models provide the inspiration.

“The model makes a difference on live drawing nights,” says guild member Ilene Silberstein, of Port Washington.

Figure model Connie DeLise, of West Islip, is a favorite among guild members.

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It has become common practice for DeLise to come equipped with props. On one evening in March, she started out the session in pants and a long-sleeve shirt and ended it in a swimsuit, cover-up and beach hat.

Sketching, these artists say, has allowed them to stretch their imaginations.

“It’s something you don’t lose,” Gleischer says. “If you have your mind, you have your skill.”