Feed Me

The dish on Long Island's restaurant and food scene.

In 2011, Hal Goodale began selling milk from a few cows and goats that he raised on his farm in Aquebogue, becoming the first Long Island operation to be licensed by New York State to pasteurize, bottle and sell its own milk.

Two years later, he’s gone from five cows to nine, and produces about 250 gallons of milk each week. He’s also learned that the most profitable aspects of the milk business are the products that add value to milk and extend its shelf life. So, the lion's share of his milk gets turned into fresh cheese, butter, feta, yogurt and, as of this summer, frozen yogurt.

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Goodale’s is made from yogurt, sugar and his farm’s own fruit. (If you thought that yogurt was the main ingredient in most commercial frozen yogurts, read this.) The result is lean, tart and refreshing. Goodale Farms frozen yogurt, $5 for 12 ounces, comes in raspberry, blackberry, blueberry, peach and strawberry.

If you’re planning a visit to the North Fork, stop by the farm (268 Main Rd., Aquebogue, 631-901-5975, www.goodalefarms.com) to pick up a cup. (Goodale Farms is also one of the North Fork’s very best venues for viewing and petting adorable baby goats.) The frozen yogurt is also sold at farmers markets in Rockville Centre, Babylon, Port Jefferson, Southampton, East Hampton, Shelter Island and Montauk.