The staff's black T-shirts carry a motto on the right sleeve: "Slurp it!"

Rameniacs agree, consuming bowl after bowl of noodles and broth at Momi Ramen, the noisy, new Floridian simmering where Turtle Crossing once smoked barbecue and Wei Fun updated Chinese classics.

Now, the hard-surface, contemporary sprawl is split. A stylized map showing a circuitous, broken-line route from Miami, home of the original, to the Hamptonian offspring, decorates the dividing wall. The illustrations on that map do suggest a fierce outbreak of shimeji mushrooms somewhere near north Brookhaven.

A communal table for 14 bisects the front dining room. A bar with eight stools and a few tables for two flank it. This design is pleasant enough until the prime-time crowd arrives at once, anxious to be seated. Delays ensue, and farinaceous frenzy breaks out. Be patient.

After all, the pork bone-and-marrow broth has been cooking several times longer than it took diners to get here from LIE Exit 70. Momi Ramen advises that the opaque, almost creamy tonkotsu broth is filtered and simmered for more than 15 hours. The thin, textured, resilient wheat noodles are made in-house throughout the day. They're not refrigerated.

And the result is delicious, served in purely functional metal bowls. Sample the tonkotsu ramen with braised pork belly, bamboo shoots, shimejis, sesame, scallions and a half a soft-boiled egg; or with oxtail and kindred company. The "just ramen" production is easily recommended, too.

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You also may choose the fine shoyu ramen, with a soy-based broth. The comparatively spicy tan tan ramen arrives with garlic-and-pepper marinated minced pork; the mild chicken ramen, with grilled chicken breast, is its counterpoint.

Cold ramen includes snow crab and salmon roe, along with nori seaweed. Clam ramen stars sake-saturated Manilas and flying fish roe. "Special ramen" take in a vegetarian variant with shiitake mushrooms and cabbage; gluten-free shirataki ramen are made with konjac root yams. They're worth sampling.

Precede the ramen with a few "share plates," among them delicate steamed shrimp-and-pork dumplings; crunchy deep-fried chicken spiked with wasabi salt; kimchee pork; rock shrimp-and-water chestnut lettuce wraps; and a lively daikon salad, with spicy cod-and-pollock roe mayo. Trailing them are overcooked pan-fried pork-and-vegetable dumplings; greasy, thinly cut grilled short ribs; routine grilled salmon.

For dessert, settle on a green-tea or red-bean ice cream sandwich made with pancakes.

Or, use your noodle and just depart satisfied.