Soon after being dropped off at my house, my almost-12-year-old great-granddaughter complained about not wanting to stay, saying she was old enough to be home alone.

I said, “No.” Her parents wanted her to stay with me until they came back. She carried on about how she wanted to be in her own house and would walk home if I wouldn’t take her.

After several minutes of bantering back and forth, I said if she kept aggravating me I would pull her hair out. She shot me a look that could kill and retreated to the basement.

She came back up in 45 minutes with a stack of envelopes. When I asked about them, she said they were invitations to a birthday pool party at her grandfather’s house. I said, “Don’t give them out because when Grandpa hears about your answering back he’s not going to allow it.”

Another look.

That weekend we were all at Grandpa’s (my son’s) home for dinner, and I told him what happened and that she was going to ask about having her party here. I suggested he tell her she has to ask me, which he did.

Her face dropped. No response. A few days later, she asked, “So can I have my party at Grandpa’s?” I said, “No.”

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She walked away, then returned and stated, “You know, I couldn’t have been that bad, I still have all my hair.”

I refrained from laughing and said if she wrote a short note of apology with a promise never to do it again by the end of the week, I would reconsider.

Needless to say, the note was never written, so when my son and I were on the way to the airport for vacation, I suggested he text the parents and just say, “No note, no party, no kidding.”

When we returned, a beautiful handmade decorated card with “I’m sorry” all over it and promises of good behavior was given to me. (It’s a keeper.)

She had a great party and behaves properly. Now her looks come with a smile.

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Connie Kamen,

Sound Beach