Oyster Bay concessionaire Ravinder Chopra’s felony plea for aggravated driving while intoxicated and endangering the welfare of a child has been vacated in State Supreme Court.

Justice Patricia Harrington in Mineola on Thursday sentenced the 52-year-old New Hyde Park resident to one year of having an ignition interlock device on his car and his driver’s license was revoked for six months. The judge said Chopra’s guilty plea for misdemeanor DWI for the 2014 incident remains on his record.

Chopra’s company, which manages the town-owned Woodlands catering hall, has a liquor license.

StoryTown concessionaire expects charges reduced

“It’s something that we would look at,” state Liquor Authority spokesman William Crowley said of the misdemeanor conviction. “We look at character and fitness.”

Currently, the liquor authority lists indicted restaurateur Harendra Singh as the principal of the company, S.R.B. Convention and Catering, Inc. Newsday previously reported that he sold his shares to Chopra and Manoj Narang in 2014.

For several weeks, the Oyster Bay town board has been expected to address the future of the town concessions. The board meets again Tuesday.

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As for the future of the concessions, Town Supervisor John Venditto said at the Feb. 2 board meeting that any investors in their operations would be vetted. Venditto has not said what that would entail.

Oyster Bay’s outside attorney Jonathan Pickhardt of Manhattan-based Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP said last week that the vetting meant board members would receive background reports on the investors “within the next few days” and would then decide how to use that information.

Records show that there are two federal court cases involving Chopra, and Pickhardt confirmed in an interview that the vetting process had found them.

One pending civil case brought against Chopra last year by California-based Geo-Group Communications Inc., in the U.S. Southern District Court in Manhattan alleges that he transferred millions of dollars to prevent it from collecting money owed.

On Thursday Chopra said “no comment” when asked about the case.

In another case, brought by Garden City Park-based Yash Raj Films USA Inc., in 2004, U.S. District Court Judge John Gleeson ordered Chopra to pay $93,000 in restitution for the sale of unauthorized copies of DVDs and CDs from a video store in Flushing.

Councilman Joseph Pinto said the lawsuits concerned him but that the board doesn’t have any control over who owns the concession company. Councilwoman Michele Johnson said she was reviewing the lawsuits.

Other board members either declined to comment on Chopra or did not respond to requests for comment.