Two immigrants living on Long Island were among 114 foreign nationals arrested during a recent sweep in the metropolitan area of those wanted for various offenses and violations, the federal immigration enforcement agency said Wednesday.

The announcement by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement did not disclose the identities of the two immigrants — one living in Nassau County and one in Suffolk — or why they were arrested.

A spokeswoman for the agency’s New York field office said the two were apprehended as part of an operation “targeting at-large criminal aliens, illegal re-entrants and immigration fugitives.”

The enforcement operation took place over 11 days and led to the arrests of immigrants living in New York City’s five boroughs and neighboring counties. Most of those arrested resided in Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn and the Bronx.

ICE is acting under a mandate to crack down on illegal immigration and to pursue for deportation immigrants who have committed criminal offenses.

Of the men and women arrested in the recent sweep, 82 had criminal histories, including prior convictions for sex crimes, drug offenses and fraud. The most frequent charges for those with criminal convictions were driving under the influence, drug trafficking, assault, fraud and drug possession.

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Thirty-seven of those arrested had previously been issued final orders of removal by immigration judges, ICE said. Eleven of those arrested face criminal prosecution in federal courts for having re-entered the country after deportation.

It was unclear how many of those arrested fell into more than one of those categories. The agency has said it does not identify those it arrests because of privacy concerns.

ICE’s Enforcement and Removal Operations deportation officers “are committed to enforcing the immigration laws set forth by our legislators,” said a statement from Thomas Decker, the field office’s director in New York.

Immigrant advocates have criticized President Donald Trump’s emphasis on cranking up deportations, moving away from discretionary policies under former President Barack Obama that had exempted unauthorized immigrants not seen as immediate threats to public safety.