Dave Morrison is the go-to guy for LIRR love and lore

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Author, historian and preservationist Dave Morrison of Plainview is helping spearhead restoration of the old Oyster Bay train station. When work is completed next year, it will house the Oyster Bay Railroad Museum.

 

Outside the station

Author, historian and preservationist Dave Morrison is helping
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

Author, historian and preservationist Dave Morrison is helping to spearhead restoration of the old Oyster Bay train station, which will be home to the Oyster Bay Railroad Museum when work is completed in 2018.

 

Teddy on the train

A photograph shows Theodore Roosevelt boarding a train
(Credit: David Morrison Collection)

Theodore Roosevelt boards a train at the Oyster Bay train station circa 1900.

 

Station exterior

Author, historian and preservationist Dave Morrison is helping
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

The old Oyster Bay train station is being remodeled outside as well as inside. When finished -- work is scheduled to be completed next year -- it will house the Oyster Bay Railroad Museum.

 

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Vintage shot

A vintage photograph shows the Oyster Bay train
(Credit: David Morrison Collection)

The Oyster Bay train station, complete with canopies over the platforms, circa 1903.

 

A cut above

Carpenter Thor Kornelliussen works on the restoration of
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

Carpenter Thor Kornelliussen works at the old Oyster Bay train station. In the course of the restoration, workers uncovered the station's 25-foot cathedral ceiling.

 

19th-century engraving

A vintage engraving shows the Oyster Bay train
(Credit: David Morrison Collection)

This artwork shows the Oyster Bay train station circa 1892.

 

A glass act

The old Oyster Bay train station is undergoing
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

Work at the old Oyster Bay train station includes the restoration of the original leaded glass in the windows.

 

Standing tall

Carpenter Sam Drucker adds rafter extensions to the
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

Carpenter Sam Drucker adds rafter extensions to the roof of the old Oyster Bay train station.

 

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Eagle eye

Author, historian and preservationist Dave Morrison is helping
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

Author, historian and preservationist Dave Morrison, who is helping to spearhead restoration of the old Oyster Bay train station, also helped locate the 22 eagle sculptures that were scattered after the controversial demolition of Penn station in the 1960s. He is shown with the head that had broken off one of those sculptures.

 

Eagles over Penn Station

A photograph from the early 1960s shows the
(Credit: David Morrison Collection)

A photograph from the early 1960s shows the eagle sculptures over the Seventh Avenue entrance of Pennsylvania Station.

 

A sign of the times

Author, historian and preservationist Dave Morrison is helping
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

There's no doubt where you are when you look up at the exterior of the old Oyster Bay train station, which is being restored and, when finished next year, will house the Oyster Bay Railroad Museum.

 

Fireplace location

Author, historian and preservationist Dave Morrison is helping
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

Author, historian and preservationist Dave Morrison points out the location of the original fireplace, which will also be restored at the old Oyster Bay train station.

 

He knows railroads like a book

Author, historian and preservationist Dave Morrison is helping
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

Author, historian and preservationist Dave Morrison sits in his Plainview home with one of the books he has written about the Long Island Rail Road. Over the years, Morrison has acquired an extensive collection of historic railroad-related photographs and books.

 

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An eagle has landed

Author, historian and preservationist Dave Morrison is helping
(Credit: Newsday/John Paraskevas)

Author, historian and preservationist Dave Morrison, who is helping to spearhead restoration of the old Oyster Bay train station, also helped locate the 22 eagle sculptures that were scattered after the controversial demolition of Penn station in the 1960s. He is shown here with one of those sculptures now on permanent display in the parking lot of the Hicksville LIRR station.

 

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