VOTING

6 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday at Bayville Intermediate School, Ann MacArthur Primary School and Brookville Reformed Church.

THE BUDGET

The district proposes an $84,082,613 budget for 2017-18, a 1.46 percent increase from the current $82,875,746. The tax levy would increase 1.3 percent, from $77,278,903 to $78,283,529.

This increase is within the district’s tax-cap limit of 1.33 percent, so a simple majority vote will be required to approve the budget.

School taxes on the average single-family house under the proposed budget could not be determined because final assessment figures were not available.

The proposed budget includes a 1.72 percent salary increase and a 1.85 percent step increase for teachers. Three teacher positions would be added.

There are two propositions. One would authorize the district to spend $745,000 from a capital reserve fund for a generator at Bayville Primary School and upgrading safety at the entrances at Bayville, Locust Valley Middle School/High School, Bayville Intermediate School, Ann MacArthur Primary School and Locust Valley Intermediate School. Another proposition would authorize setting up a $5 million capital reserve fund for heating and ventilation upgrades, roof replacement, security enhancements and bathroom upgrades at district buildings and other district projects.

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THE CANDIDATES

Anthony Alfieri, John Del Tatto Jr., Amy Hochberg, Sarah Henris and Shawn C. Steele are running for three at-large seats. Del Tatto Jr. and Henris are running as a team. Terms are three years.

Anthony Alfieri

BACKGROUND: Alfieri, 56, has lived in the district for 15 years. He is senior director of business development for Japan Post, a global transportation and distribution business. Alfieri has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Pittsburgh and a master of business administration degree from Northwestern University. He is a member of the American Club in China, a worldwide social club. His daughter attends a district school.

ISSUES: Alfieri said, “I believe in a quality education for Locust Valley School District and keeping academic standards at a high level.” Alfieri said that the district should install a turf field at its high school to replace the grass field because he said “most of the fields that you find now are a much-improved turf technology.” He said if elected, he would “try to improve on the ability of students to excel in Advanced Placement courses by making sure the teachers have the right curriculum.”

John Del Tatto Jr.

BACKGROUND: Del Tatto Jr., 63, is a lifelong district resident and works as a salesperson at Porsche of Roslyn in Roslyn Heights. He graduated from Locust Valley High School and has a bachelor’s degree from Florida State University in Tallahassee. His daughter attends school in the district.

ISSUES: Del Tatto Jr. said that after attending school board meetings for seven years, he decided “now is the time for a change in our district.” He said if elected, he would use his business education, experience and knowledge “to ensure that the board of education continues to be good stewards of the taxpayer dollar.” He said he also would encourage “more open dialogue” between district officials and the community. Del Tatto Jr. said: “I would like the community to see a preliminary budget in February instead of in April so that it can be explained and reviewed thoroughly.”

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Amy Hochberg

BACKGROUND: Hochberg, 58, has lived in the district for 23 years. She is a business consultant for EVO Payments International in Melville. Hochberg has a bachelor’s degree from Hofstra University and a master of business administration from Pace University. Hochberg was president of the Locust Valley High School Parents’ Council and the middle school parents’ council, and treasurer of the elementary parents’ council. Her three children attended district schools.

ISSUES: Hochberg said if elected, she would propose offering the district’s International Baccalaureate program in grades K-12 instead of only in the 11th and 12th grades. Hochberg said the program prepares students for college and “teaches them to do in-depth research and how to write better essays.” Hochberg said, “It is very difficult for young people to afford housing on Long Island, particularly on the North Shore,” adding, “we need to make our representatives in Albany accountable to our communities on Long Island so that our children and grandchildren can afford to live here.”

Sarah Henris

BACKGROUND: Henris, 50, has lived in the district for 25 years. She is a floral design assistant at English Country Flowers in Oyster Bay. Henris is a graduate of the Rhodes Preparatory School in Manhattan. She studied at Long Island University in Brooklyn and the Fashion Institute of Technology in Manhattan. Henris has two children, one a district graduate and the other attending a district school. Henris is the legislation chair of the Nassau Region PTA and chairs the church council of the Village Church of Bayville, where she is also a coordinator of the family engagement ministry.

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ISSUES: Henris said the school board should “provide more information about the budget and financing of the district and how they tie into our long-term strategic plans.” Henris continued, “If the school board has a long-range plan, the community should know about it, or we should develop one.” She said the long-range plan should include capital improvements and educational goals. Henris said she would like the school board to return to forming committees and focus groups to study important issues.

Shawn C. Steele

BACKGROUND: Steele, 27, is a lifelong resident of the district. He is a teacher in New York City. He graduated from Locust Valley High School and has a bachelor’s degree from Bard College and a master’s degree in history from Queens College.

ISSUES: Steele said that as a district alumnus and current New York City schoolteacher, he has “a unique perspective on the demands that are currently placed on students.” Steele said he is concerned about “student mental health” and said, “it is crucial that our district refocus its attention on promoting students’ well-being.” Steele said, “I seek to advocate for a return to a more balanced academic-social life for our students.”