+-
Rail trail organizers, from left, Denis Byrne, Ronne (Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.)

Rail trail organizers, from left, Denis Byrne, Ronne Cosel and Mike Cosel have spent 12 years working to make the trail a possibility. (Sept 21, 2013)

From rail to trail

Recreation is the next stop for the LIRR's old Wading River line.

An undated photo of the Wading River engine
(Credit: David Morrison Collection)

An undated photo of the Wading River engine house.

The Long Island Rail Road's Shoreham station in1918.

The Long Island Rail Road's Shoreham station in1918.

Miller's Place railroad station as seen in 1915.
(Credit: David Morrison Collection)

Miller's Place railroad station as seen in 1915.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
The Long Island Rail Road's Wading River branch

The Long Island Rail Road's Wading River branch opened in 1895 and had four stops: Miller Place, Rocky Point, Shoreham and Wading River.

The stone bridge across Woodville Road in Shoreham

The stone bridge across Woodville Road in Shoreham is the last of four originally built for the line. A group celebrates the 100th anniversary of the bridge in 1995.

Rail trail organizers, from left, Denis Byrne, Ronne
Buy photo
(Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.)

Rail trail organizers, from left, Denis Byrne, Ronne Cosel and Mike Cosel have spent 12 years working to make the trail a possibility. (Sept 21, 2013)

The Woodville Bridge in Shoreham, which cars still
(Credit: Handout)

The Woodville Bridge in Shoreham, which cars still drive under today, was built in 1895.

From left, Denis Byrne of Long Island Greenways
Buy photo
(Credit: Barry Sloan)

From left, Denis Byrne of Long Island Greenways and Healthy Trails, Mike Cosel, Long Island Railroad historian David Morrison, and Ronne Cosel discuss plans for a Port Jefferson-Wading River rail trail beneath a former LIRR bridge in Shoreham. The proposed 13-mile trail will pass over the bridge. (Sept.15, 2013)

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
Mike and Ronne Cosel, of Setauket, with Denis
Buy photo
(Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.)

Mike and Ronne Cosel, of Setauket, with Denis Byrne, right, of Port Jefferson, have spent 12 years working on the rail trail. (Sept 21, 2013).

A section of the proposed 13-mile Port Jefferson-Wading
Buy photo
(Credit: Barry Sloan)

A section of the proposed 13-mile Port Jefferson-Wading River rail trail is pictured in Wading River. (Sept. 15, 2013)

The Long Island Rail Road's Rocky Point station
(Credit: Handout)

The Long Island Rail Road's Rocky Point station is shown in the early 1900s.

The Thurber Lumber Company in Rocky Point was
Buy photo
(Credit: Barry Sloan)

The Thurber Lumber Company in Rocky Point was once home to the hamlet's LIRR station. (Sept.15, 2013)

Historical photos of the LIRR. The last passenger
(Credit: Handout)

Historical photos of the LIRR. The last passenger run was on October 9, 1938. The branch was thereafter used for freight service until fully abandoned in 1939.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
The boom expected after the expansion of the
(Credit: Handout)

The boom expected after the expansion of the Wading River line never came and the LIRR shut it down in 1938 due to low ridership.

Stones from this 1939 demolition project were taken
(Credit: Handout)

Stones from this 1939 demolition project were taken to the beach where they can be seen today as a retaining wall.

From left, Long Island Railroad historian David Morrison,
Buy photo
(Credit: Barry Sloan)

From left, Long Island Railroad historian David Morrison, Denis Byrne of Long Island Greenways and Healthy Trails, and Ronne Cosel discuss plans for a Port Jefferson-Wading River rail trail in Wading River. (Sept.15, 2013)

Get The 1600 newsletter, our inside look at the race to the White House.

Comments

Newsday.com now uses Facebook for our comment boards. Please read our guidelines and connect your Facebook account to comment.