Upload Photo
After he and his family immigrated to the
Caption / Share

After he and his family immigrated to the United States in 1951, Holocaust survivor Irving Roth says an uncle urged him to forget what he had been through. "I suspect it was partially true that forgetting was an easier way out, but the experience was so seared in my brain I couldn't do that," he said. A return visit to Poland in 1998 inspired Roth, who now lives in Williston Park, to create the Adopt a Survivor program, which pairs survivors with young people who can impart their stories and carry on their 'adoptee's' legacy. "I thought of how the students would just remember these people as bodies, corpses," Roth recalled thinking at the time. "This was not simply a mass of humanity who perished, but individual human beings."(Credit: Newsday Photo / Bruce Gilbert)

1 of 15

Share this photo

Holocaust's historians

Holocaust survivors Irving Roth and Ron Unger have both participated in Roth's Adopt a Survivor program, which pairs survivors with young people who can impart their stories and carry on their 'adoptee's' legacy.