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The jaws of a shark greet customers at (Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

The jaws of a shark greet customers at Atlantic Seafood Fish Market in Center Moriches. (Aug. 20, 2012)

Long Island's quirky characters

Statues, signs around Long Island add quirky charm to sites from Glen Cove to Montauk.

The jaws of a shark greet customers at
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

The jaws of a shark greet customers at Atlantic Seafood Fish Market in Center Moriches. (Aug. 20, 2012)

Popeye advertises spinach at the Hayground Market farm
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Popeye advertises spinach at the Hayground Market farm stand in Bridgehampton. The family that owns the stand has farmed on Long Island since the 1600s, one family member says. Popeye appears in the spring and then again in the fall, to coincide with the spinach crops. (Sept. 2012)

Pirate sculptures and their parrots keep watch at
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Pirate sculptures and their parrots keep watch at a house on East Riviera Drive in Lindenhurst. (March 29, 2012)

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A giant hot dog and bun sit atop
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

A giant hot dog and bun sit atop First National Franks in Medford, with a sign saying “Cold Drinks, Cool People.” (Aug. 16, 2011)

Bronze statues of children grace sites in Shirley,
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Bronze statues of children grace sites in Shirley, Mastic and Mastic Beach. They are among 25 figures found in Atlantic City by Pat Matthews of Shirley and brought home, thanks to the William Floyd Community Summit. (Aug. 20, 2012)

Public opposition kept the Shoreham nuclear power plant
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Public opposition kept the Shoreham nuclear power plant from ever operating. Completed in 1984 near a stream feeding into Long Island Sound, it was fully decommissioned by 1994, but a warning still stands. (July 3, 2012)

Bronze statues of children grace sites in Shirley,
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Bronze statues of children grace sites in Shirley, Mastic and Mastic Beach. They are among 25 figures found in Atlantic City by Pat Matthews of Shirley and brought home, thanks to the William Floyd Community Summit. (Aug. 20, 2012)

On Wading River Manor Road in Calverton, a
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

On Wading River Manor Road in Calverton, a statue of a giant bull is fenced in on a pasture on a private farm. (Aug. 20, 2012)

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This swordsman by Theophilus Brouwer fences with another
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

This swordsman by Theophilus Brouwer fences with another across the road outside Casa Basso in Westhampton. The Italian restaurant opened in 1928, but the 12-foot statues and castle date to the late 1800s. (Aug. 20, 2012)

A giant tiki sits in front of the
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

A giant tiki sits in front of the Montauk Beach House, formerly called the Ronjo Resort Motel. (October 2012)

St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church in Glen Cove
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church in Glen Cove has a commanding voice of authority for this spot. (April 25, 2012)

Metal pond ducks at Eisenhower Park in East
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Metal pond ducks at Eisenhower Park in East Meadow advise visitors not to feed the real ducks bread, popcorn and crackers to avoid spurring aggressive behavior. (July 8, 2012)

Bronze statues found by Shirley resident Pat Matthews
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Bronze statues found by Shirley resident Pat Matthews and her husband while vacationing in Atlantic City, then bought by the William Floyd Community Summit (Pat Matthews was the chairwoman of the committee, a group of citizens and representatives from the Mastic and Shirley wishing to beautifying their area). Those statues and at least 23 others now have become little landmarks throughout Shirley, Mastic, and Mastic Beach with many, such as this one, found on William Floyd Parkway in Mastic. (Aug. 20, 2012)

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Lion Gardiner, one of the original settlers of
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Lion Gardiner, one of the original settlers of Long Island and for whom Gardiner's Island is named after, lies in this tomb that was built in 1886 and designed by James Renwick, Jr., depicting him in recumbent effigy pose in East Hampton. Lion Gardiner was born in England in 1599 and died in East Hampton in 1663. (September 2012)

This giant sculpture of a gorilla stands outside
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

This giant sculpture of a gorilla stands outside the farmstand called Olde Towne Gardens, on 360 Old Town Rd., at the corner of Bunny Lane in East Setauket. (Mar. 31, 2012)

A giant, beaked witch that looks over Wicks
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

A giant, beaked witch that looks over Wicks Nursery in St. James permamently, peers at a seasonal display of pumpkins. (September 2012)

Sculptures on the property of Casa Basso in
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Sculptures on the property of Casa Basso in Westhampton, an Italian restaurant since 1928. The statues and 'castle,' however, date to the late 1800s, when an American artist and sculptor Theophilus Brouwer settled in Westhampton. (Aug. 20, 2012)

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