+-
Chief Harry Wallace, leader of the Unkechaug Indian (Credit: Jesse Newman)

Chief Harry Wallace, leader of the Unkechaug Indian Nation, sits outside his office on the Poospatuck Reservation. The Unkechaug ("People from beyond the hill") Nation maintains a sovereign relationship with the State of New York and the United States. Poospatuck ("where the waters meet") is on the South Shore of Long Island. (August 26, 2010)

Native American tribes on Long Island

On the East End, Native American tribes carry on traditions to honor the departed.

Veronica Treadwell, a member of the Unkechaug Indian
(Credit: Jesse Newman)

Veronica Treadwell, a member of the Unkechaug Indian Nation, holds a photograph of her deceased father, Chief Lone Otter (Donald E. Treadwell). Chief Lone Otter died in 1995 and was buried in his full regalia. When a member of the Unkechaug Indian Nation dies, the entire community gathers for burial. Traditionally, Unkechaug Indians bury their dead alongside sacred mementos to accompany them on their spiritual journey. One year later, a memorial service called the Wiping of the Tears ceremony is performed. It cleanses the immediate family and allows the living to resume their lives. (August 26, 2010)

Veronica Treadwell, a member of the Unkechaug Indian
(Credit: Jesse Newman)

Veronica Treadwell, a member of the Unkechaug Indian Nation, holds a photograph of her deceased father, Chief Lone Otter (Donald E. Treadwell). Chief Lone Otter died in 1995 and was buried in his full regalia. (August 26, 2010)

Veronica Treadwell, a member of the Unkechaug Indian
(Credit: Jesse Newman)

Veronica Treadwell, a member of the Unkechaug Indian Nation, stands amid tall grass at a sacred site on the Poospatuck Reservation on the South Shore of Long Island. "The Point" faces east, and members of the Unkechaug Indian Nation gather here throughout the year for ceremonies such as the Sunrise Ceremony, and to pray, or invoke the spirit of their ancestors. Veronica remembers her deceased father, Chief Lone Otter (Donald E. Treadwell), when she is here. (August 26, 2010)

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
Veronica Treadwell, a member of the Unkechaug Indian
(Credit: Jesse Newman)

Veronica Treadwell, a member of the Unkechaug Indian Nation, walks out onto a pier at the eastern tip of the Poospatuck Reservation. "The Point" is a sacred site for Unkechaug Indians. (August 26, 2010)

An old church sits on the Poospatuck Reservation
(Credit: Jesse Newman)

An old church sits on the Poospatuck Reservation on Long Island. Once the site of religious prayer and ceremonies, it now awaits renovation. Today, both priests and medicine men serve the spiritual needs of the Unkechaug Indians, who gather in a newer building next door. (August 26, 2010)

A traditional wampum belt hangs outside the office
(Credit: Jesse Newman)

A traditional wampum belt hangs outside the office of Chief Harry Wallace, leader of the Unkechaug Indian Nation on the Poospatuck Reservation on Long Island. It is strung with white and purple beads carved from quahog, or clam, found locally around Long Island. The belt is used during burials and other sacred ceremonies. (August 26, 2010)

Chief Harry Wallace, leader of the Unkechaug Indian
(Credit: Jesse Newman)

Chief Harry Wallace, leader of the Unkechaug Indian Nation on the Poospatuck Reservation on Long Island, holds a traditional wampum belt. (August 26, 2010)

Chief Harry Wallace, leader of the Unkechaug Indian
(Credit: Jesse Newman)

Chief Harry Wallace, leader of the Unkechaug Indian Nation on the Poospatuck Reservation in Long Island, holds a necklace strung with carved quahog, or clam-shell, found on locally in Long Island. It is used during burials and other sacred ceremonies. (August 26, 2010)

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE
Chief Harry Wallace, leader of the Unkechaug Indian
(Credit: Jesse Newman)

Chief Harry Wallace, leader of the Unkechaug Indian Nation, sits outside his office on the Poospatuck Reservation. The Unkechaug ("People from beyond the hill") Nation maintains a sovereign relationship with the State of New York and the United States. Poospatuck ("where the waters meet") is on the South Shore of Long Island. (August 26, 2010)

Get The 1600 newsletter

Our inside look at the race to the White House.

Comments

Newsday.com now uses Facebook for our comment boards. Please read our guidelines and connect your Facebook account to comment.