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The sphinx was built by Capt. Will Graham, (Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

The sphinx was built by Capt. Will Graham, owner and operator of the Anchorage Inn in Blue Point. After the inn burned down in the 1920s, the property was eventually sold to Tony and Helen Ferri, who lived on and operated a gas station on the site. They continued caring for sphinx until they sold the property in 1973. The Ferri's were the in-laws of Lou Fontana (now deceased). He and his twin, John, restored the sphinx and put it back on public display in 1983 in front of their business, Fontana Concrete in Bayport. (Aug. 4, 2011)

Only on Long Island

Cemetery headstones shaped liked the upper torso. A cemetery in the parking lot of Home Depot. A massive, white stone sphinx. Faux construction workers dangling from the side of a house. Photographer Thomas A. Ferrara journeyed across Long Island and captured some of the area's "unexpected" scenery. Ferrara shot the photos on an iPhone and then used the Hipstamatic app on them. The app enhances the color and tone of the photograph and can also allow for special effects, such as the appearance of a Polaroid photo or other vintage look.

The sphinx was built by Capt. Will Graham,
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

The sphinx was built by Capt. Will Graham, owner and operator of the Anchorage Inn in Blue Point. After the inn burned down in the 1920s, the property was eventually sold to Tony and Helen Ferri, who lived on and operated a gas station on the site. They continued caring for sphinx until they sold the property in 1973. The Ferri's were the in-laws of Lou Fontana (now deceased). He and his twin, John, restored the sphinx and put it back on public display in 1983 in front of their business, Fontana Concrete in Bayport. (Aug. 4, 2011)

Mock workers, made out of wood, steel and
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Mock workers, made out of wood, steel and polyester, stand on the facade of Giuseppe Telese's house on 1995 Salisbury Park Drive in Westbury, works of art that he made and placed to make him smile. (Aug. 18, 2011)

In the parking lot of the Commack Home
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

In the parking lot of the Commack Home Depot, there is a cemetery that once served the Burr family who, in 1630, bought 166 acres of land. At some point the cemetery was established with the newest gravestone dated at 1878. During WWI the land was turned into Brindley Field, a 90-acre training facility for pilots, and deactivated in 1919. Modell's Sporting Goods was the first to swallow the graveyard with its parking lot, later Old Navy, and most recently Home Depot. (Aug. 7, 2011)

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Big Chief Lewis, according to the placque, was
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Big Chief Lewis, according to the placque, was built by Rodman Shutt of Strasburg, PA and erected on May 21, 1968 in a space between the Massapequa Post Office and the Big Chief Lewis building off Sunrise Highway and Killians Road, and is flanked by a fiberglass rearing horse on one side and a buffalo on the other. (Aug. 5, 2011)

Big Chief Lewis, according to the plaque, was
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Big Chief Lewis, according to the plaque, was built by Rodman Shutt of Strasburg, PA and erected on May 21, 1968 in a space between the Massapequa Post Office and the Big Chief Lewis building off Sunrise Highway and Killians Road and is flanked by a fiberglass rearing horse on one side and a buffalo on the other. (Aug. 5, 2011)

This gas station in Yaphank was originally a
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

This gas station in Yaphank was originally a Shell Station in 1937. The Suffolk County Police Historical Society replicated it using old photographs and by interviewing local residents. The pumps are the exact models used at this station. In the 1970s, the county used it as an East End police garage, but by the 1990s, the building had fallen into a state of disrepair. Today the building is an annex of the Suffolk Police Museum and houses their vintage police vehicle collection. (Aug. 4, 2011)

This gas station in Yaphank was originally a
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

This gas station in Yaphank was originally a Shell Station in 1937. The Suffolk County Police Historical Society replicated it using old photographs and by interviewing local residents. The pumps are the exact models used at this station. In the 1970s, the county used it as an East End police garage, but by the 1990s, the building had fallen into a state of disrepair. Today the building is an annex of the Suffolk Police Museum and houses their vintage police vehicle collection. (Aug. 4, 2011)

This gas station in Yaphank was originally a
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

This gas station in Yaphank was originally a Shell Station in 1937. The Suffolk County Police Historical Society replicated it using old photographs and by interviewing local residents. The pumps are the exact models used at this station. In the 1970s, the county used it as an East End police garage, but by the 1990s, the building had fallen into a state of disrepair. Today the building is an annex of the Suffolk Police Museum and houses their vintage police vehicle collection. (Aug. 4, 2011)

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This gas station in Yaphank was originally a
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

This gas station in Yaphank was originally a Shell Station in 1937. The Suffolk County Police Historical Society replicated it using old photographs and by interviewing local residents. The pumps are the exact models used at this station. In the 1970s, the county used it as an East End police garage, but by the 1990s, the building had fallen into a state of disrepair. Today the building is an annex of the Suffolk Police Museum and houses their vintage police vehicle collection. (Aug. 4, 2011)

The Brewster Burial Grounds in Copiague have gravesites
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

The Brewster Burial Grounds in Copiague have gravesites that date from around 1800 to 1873, dedicated "In Memory of the First Native American Families of Long Island and Those Known Only to the Great Spirit," with some gravestones honoring civil war veterans. Here, a grave for Sidney Brewster, which is one of three graves carved in the early 1950s out of cement blocks by nephew Richard Brewster who was a cement mason. (Aug. 8, 2011)

The Brewster Burial Grounds in Copiague have gravesites
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

The Brewster Burial Grounds in Copiague have gravesites that date from around 1800 to 1873, dedicated "In Memory of the First Native American Families of Long Island and Those Known Only to the Great Spirit," with some gravestones honoring civil war veterans. Here, the plaque from the Town of Babylon. (Aug. 8, 2011)

The Brewster Burial Grounds in Copiague have gravesites
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

The Brewster Burial Grounds in Copiague have gravesites that date from around 1800 to 1873, dedicated "In Memory of the First Native American Families of Long Island and Those Known Only to the Great Spirit," with some gravestones honoring civil war veterans. Here, a grave for Sidney Brewster, which is one of three graves carved in the early 1950s out of cement blocks by Richard Brewster who was a cement mason. (Aug. 8, 2011)

The Brewster Burial Grounds in Copiague have gravesites
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

The Brewster Burial Grounds in Copiague have gravesites that date from around 1800 to 1873, dedicated "In Memory of the First Native American Families of Long Island and Those Known Only to the Great Spirit," with some gravestones honoring civil war veterans. Here, a grave for Florance H. Brewster, which is one of three graves carved in the early 1950s out of cement blocks by nephew Richard Brewster who was a cement mason. (Aug. 8, 2011)

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For some of the statues outside Yesterday's Treasures,
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

For some of the statues outside Yesterday's Treasures, a shop in Southampton, "yesterday" connotes a time that was long, long ago: Just ask the T-rex awaiting a move from the shop to a theme park or museum. The shop displays an array of fiberglass and bronze statues, both real and surreal. (Feb. 18, 2012)

For some of the statues outside Yesterday's Treasures,
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

For some of the statues outside Yesterday's Treasures, a shop in Southampton, "yesterday" connotes a time that was long, long ago. The shop displays an array of fiberglass and bronze statues, both real and surreal. (Feb. 18, 2012)

For some of the statues outside Yesterday's Treasures,
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

For some of the statues outside Yesterday's Treasures, a shop in Southampton, "yesterday" connotes a time that was long, long ago. The shop displays an array of fiberglass and bronze statues, both real and surreal. (Feb. 18, 2012)

For some of the statues outside Yesterday's Treasures,
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

For some of the statues outside Yesterday's Treasures, a shop in Southampton, "yesterday" connotes a time that was long, long ago. The shop displays an array of fiberglass and bronze statues, both real and surreal. (Feb. 18, 2012)

It's not your typical welcome sign, but
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

It's not your typical welcome sign, but "Stargazer," Linda Scott's 70-by-50-foot steel and plywood sculpture, is considered by some as the unofficial gateway to the Hamptons. It was installed in 1991 on a stretch of farmland along the east side of Route 111 in Manorville. (Feb. 18, 2012)

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Need a a tree to go? This drive-through
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Need a a tree to go? This drive-through florist shop combines foliage with portability, and even - when it comes to palm trees - rentals. It's all headquartered at this Massapequa store which is not, despite its product offerings, any kind of a branch location. (July 19, 2011)

In 1941 a wood-carved mechanical eagle, with a
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

In 1941 a wood-carved mechanical eagle, with a wing-span of 20 feet, was installed by philanthropist Ward Melville on the Post Office in Stony Brook, and even today it flaps its wings on the hour from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM, synchronized with the clock on the cupola of the Post Office. (Aug. 10, 2011)

On Bayview Avenue in Southold, you can go
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

On Bayview Avenue in Southold, you can go either to the Custer Institute (really a public observatory) or to the Southold Indian Museum. (Sept. 18, 2011)

Nunley's carousel was manufactured in 1912 by Stein
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Nunley's carousel was manufactured in 1912 by Stein and Goldstein of Brooklyn and eventually moved to Nunley's Amusement Park when it opened in 1939 to 1995 when it closed and was the subject of a waltz by Billy Joel who rode it as a child. Today, it stands inside the Cradle of Aviation Museum. (Aug. 18, 2011)

Nunley's carousel was manufactured in 1912 by Stein
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Nunley's carousel was manufactured in 1912 by Stein and Goldstein of Brooklyn and eventually moved to Nunley's Amusement Park when it opened in 1939 to 1995 when it closed and was the subject of a waltz by Billy Joel who rode it as a child. Today, it stands inside the Cradle of Aviation Museum. (Aug. 18, 2011)

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The huge 13-story Building 93 was completed in
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

The huge 13-story Building 93 was completed in 1939 at The Kings Park Psychiatric Center to accommodate demand which peaked in the early 1950s where pre-frontal lobotomies and electro-shock therapy was practiced until 1955 when Thorazine was introduced. In subsequent years, the populations declined, with only a few floors of Building 93 in service in the early 1990s, after which (in 1996) the entire facility closed. (Aug. 7, 2011)

The huge 13-story Building 93 was completed in
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

The huge 13-story Building 93 was completed in 1939 at The Kings Park Psychiatric Center to accommodate demand which peaked in the early 1950s where pre-frontal lobotomies and electro-shock therapy was practiced until 1955 when Thorazine was introduced. In subsequent years, the populations declined, with only a few floors of Building 93 in service in the early 1990s, after which (in 1996) the entire facility closed, but ghost seekers and others find their way into the grounds which are spotted with graffiti. (Aug. 7, 2011)

The huge 13-story Building 93 was completed in
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

The huge 13-story Building 93 was completed in 1939 at The Kings Park Psychiatric Center to accommodate demand which peaked in the early 1950s where pre-frontal lobotomies and electro-shock therapy was practiced until 1955 when Thorazine was introduced. In subsequent years, the populations declined, with only a few floors of Building 93 in service in the early 1990s, after which (in 1996) the entire facility closed. (Aug. 7, 2011)

The Vietnam War Memorial at Bald Hill in
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

The Vietnam War Memorial at Bald Hill in Farmingville was dedicated on Veteran's Day in 1991 on a spot that from the base offers views of the Great South Bay, Fire Island and the Atlantic Ocean to the south, and of Long Island Sound and Connecticut looking north. The memorial is a four-sided 100-foot obelisk with the United States flag's stars and stripes, and is made of Georgia Cherokee marble and aluminum. Privately funded, the Vietnam War Memorial cost approximately $1.3 million to construct. (Aug. 16, 2011)

The Big Duck in Flanders was originally built
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

The Big Duck in Flanders was originally built in 1931 by duck farmer Martin Maurer in nearby Riverhead, and used as a shop to sell ducks and duck eggs, and in 1997 it was put on the National Register of Historic Places. (Aug. 3, 2011)

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The Big Duck in Flanders was originally built
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

The Big Duck in Flanders was originally built in 1931 by duck farmer Martin Maurer in nearby Riverhead, and used as a shop to sell ducks and duck eggs, and in 1997 it was put on the National Register of Historic Places. (Aug. 3, 2011)

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