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Study for “Farewell to Men of War,” 1885, (Credit: Handout)

Study for “Farewell to Men of War,” 1885, oil on canvas. This painting shows a graveyard of ships at Port Washington.

Painter of the Island

In a career spanning six decades, Charles Henry Miller -- in an effort to preserve a landscape being gutted by development -- wandered the length and breadth of Long Island to record with paint, watercolor, chalk, pencil and charcoal multiple sketches and etched images of a bucolic Long Island starting in the 1870s. Some of his works are on display in an exhibit at the Phillips House museum in Rockville Centre until Nov. 10.

Charles Henry Miller spent six decades, starting in
(Credit: Handout)

Charles Henry Miller spent six decades, starting in the 1870s, producing sketches and etched images of a bucolic Long Island.

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(Credit: Handout)

"Charles Henry Miller, N.A., Painter of Long Island," published in 2012, was co-authored by Ruth Ann Bramson, Miller's great-granddaughter, and Geoffrey K. Fleming, director of the Southold Historical Society. (Oct. 8, 2013)

Ruth Ann Bramson is co-author of a book
(Credit: Handout)

Ruth Ann Bramson is co-author of a book about her great-grandfather titled “Charles Henry Miller, N.A., Painter of Long Island."

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“Charles Henry Miller” co-author Geoffrey K. Fleming is
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(Credit: Randee Daddona)

“Charles Henry Miller” co-author Geoffrey K. Fleming is director of the Southold Historical Society and a Long Island art historian. (Oct. 8, 2013)

Study for “Farewell to Men of War,” 1885,
(Credit: Handout)

Study for “Farewell to Men of War,” 1885, oil on canvas. This painting shows a graveyard of ships at Port Washington.

“The Clothesline,” undated, oil on canvas. Here, a
(Credit: Handout)

“The Clothesline,” undated, oil on canvas. Here, a farmyard served as Miller’s muse, and a farmer can be seen gathering hay.

“Queens Village,” 1870s, oil on canvas. Miller, a
(Credit: Handout)

“Queens Village,” 1870s, oil on canvas. Miller, a resident of that area, painted and sketched many scenes there.

“Girl in a Boat,” 1880, watercolor on paper.
(Credit: Handout)

“Girl in a Boat,” 1880, watercolor on paper. Miller used a variety of mediums, including gouache, chalk, charcoal and ink.

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“Clam Boats at Little Neck Bay,” July 28,
(Credit: Handout)

“Clam Boats at Little Neck Bay,” July 28, 1877, oil on canvas. The Island’s coast provided Miller with a great deal of subject matter.

Charles Henry Miller at his easel with his
(Credit: Handout)

Charles Henry Miller at his easel with his painting of Niagara Falls.

(Credit: Handout)

"A Bavarian Landscape," 1860s, oil on paperboard. Charles Henry Miller’s three years spent in Bavaria, Germany, gave him time to explore the countryside outside of Munich where he painted many works.

(Credit: Handout)

"Plowing the Field at Sunset," 1870s, oil on panel. Charles Henry Miller was fascinated with the farming way of life that began to disappear during his own lifetime and constantly chose to describe in paint the most menial tasks.

Rory Murphy, a volunteer at the Phillips House
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(Credit: Newsday / Audrey C. Tiernan)

Rory Murphy, a volunteer at the Phillips House museum in Rockville Centre where some of Charles Henry Miller's works are on display until Nov. 10. (Oct. 4, 2013)

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