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Lodge No. 1 started out in New York (Credit: Handout)

Lodge No. 1 started out in New York City in 1868 and is now based in Lynbrook. Here, members gather for the local Memorial Day parade last May. (May 27, 2013)

The Elks lodge

The nation's first Elks lodge embraces its past, while also facing change and new challenges.

Al Hoffman, former district deputy, and Amy Schneller,
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(Credit: Heather Walsh)

Al Hoffman, former district deputy, and Amy Schneller, head of Elks Lodge No. 1. (Oct. 26, 2013)

Lodge No. 1 started out in New York
(Credit: Handout)

Lodge No. 1 started out in New York City in 1868 and is now based in Lynbrook. Here, members gather for the local Memorial Day parade last May. (May 27, 2013)

Elks members Lawrence Contratti, Al Hoffman and Dennis
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(Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.)

Elks members Lawrence Contratti, Al Hoffman and Dennis Mescall, from left, enjoy a card game at the lodge near a wall of historical photos. (Oct. 19, 2013).

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Trays of medals are part of a large
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(Credit: Heather Walsh)

Trays of medals are part of a large collection of memorabilia in the Heritage Room at Elks Lodge No. 1 in Lynbrook. (Oct. 24, 2013)

Elks members and their families perform Beach Boys
(Credit: Handout)

Elks members and their families perform Beach Boys medleys during a show last year for veterans.

The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks was
(Credit: Handout)

The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks was founded in Manhattan in 1867 by Charles Vivian. The first members including front row, E. W. Platt, William Carleton, Richard R. Steirly, Charles A. Vivian, Henry Vandermark and M. G. Ash. The back row is Frank Langhorne, William Sheppard, John T. Kent and Harry Bosworth.

The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks was
(Credit: Handout)

The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks was founded in Manhattan in 1867 by Charles Vivian.

In the Heritage Room, members look at memorabilia.
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(Credit: Heather Walsh)

In the Heritage Room, members look at memorabilia. From left, exalted ruler Amy Schneller; her husband, Paul; nephew Philip Neidecker, a past exalted ruler; Mark Stuparich, the lodge’s organist and past state vice president, and Lou Mohr, secretary. (Oct. 24, 2013)

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