Long Islanders and in New York City residents will take part in the nationwide “A Day Without a Woman” strike on Wednesday as mothers, grandmothers and small business owners call attention to the value of women — including those who labor without pay.

Kathy Lahey, 56, of Long Island Rising, will join an evening rally at the corner of Main Street and Broadway in Port Jefferson, where she lives with her family.

“Random people from all different groups will stand in solidarity,” Lahey said. “We’re going to have speakers talk about some of the history about women’s rights.”

The Trump administration’s policy proposals, such as defunding Planned Parenthood, are harmful to women’s interests, she said.

“I don’t want wealthy, white men making decisions about what I can and cannot do with my body,” Lahey said.

Organizers of the strike — scheduled for International Women’s Day — ask participants to take the day off from paid and unpaid work, refrain from shopping for one day, and wear red to show solidarity.

Some women said #DayWithoutAWoman lacked the publicity that helped built momentum for the Women’s March, which withdrew millions of women to Washington, D.C., on Jan. 21, the day after Donald Trump was sworn in as president.

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Like those who marched in the nation’s capitol, the women say they are concerned about what they view as the GOP’s assault on civil and women’s rights, including reproductive rights.

In Carle Place, members of the South Shore Women’s Caucus plan to gather at the corner of Old Country and Clinton roads, then march to the Democratic Headquarters for a luncheon, where a discussion on “Politics 101” — Local Politics in a Nutshell — will take place.

“I am going to wear red,” said the organizer, Claudia Borecky, 59, who works for Nassau County Board of Elections.

The South Shore Women’s Caucus, she said, was formed after Trump was elected president.

“After the election, many women were upset about the outcome,” Borecky said. “Here we are, we elected a president who degraded women, calling them pigs or making fun of their bodies.”

Borecky will be in Albany on Wednesday to fight proposed water rate increases and will not attend the rally she helped put together.

Sierra Zamarripa, 26, the owner and creative director of Lovewild Design in Bushwick, Brooklyn, is closing her business Wednesday so she and her two employees — one of whom is her mother — can observe the strike.

“I want to keep the momentum going,” from the Women’s March.

Others will observe and support the day in their own ways.

The Chelsea-based websites Bustle and Romper will go dark and so will their media handles for a 24-hour period, editor-in-chief Kate Ward said in a statement. And all workers will receive pay for the day.

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“We are also encouraging team members to volunteer at charities that benefit women and marginalized communities in order to recognize those who do not have the ability to participate,” Ward said.