LIRR unions, MTA offers and counteroffers, 2010-present

The previous contract between the unions and the

The previous contract between the unions and the MTA lapsed in June 2010. (Credit: Newsday / J. Conrad Williams Jr.)

The previous contract between the unions and the MTA lapsed in June 2010.

 

October 2013


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Unions' demands upon being released from mediation

* Raises totaling about 22 percent over six years

* $10 per-shift fee for federally certified conductors and similar payments to all noncertified workers

* No changes to work rules, health contributions or pensions of existing employees

* New employees would pay 1.5 percent of weekly wages toward health care costs

MTA's demands upon being released from mediation

* A five-year deal with wage freezes in the first three years, or concessions worth the same value, and 4 percent total raises over the final two years

* $10 per-shift fee for federally certified conductors would be funded by work rule concessions from conductors

* All employees would contribute 5 percent of wages to pensions going forward, as opposed to the current plan of employees paying 3 or 4 percent for only 10 years

* Future retirees' LIRR pensions would be offset by the amount they collect in federal disability annuities, a measure that aims to deter disability fraud

* Current workers would pay 12 percent of health care premiums; future workers would pay 14 percent

 

December 2013

Presidential Emergency Board 244's recommendations, which the union has supported

* Raises totaling about 17 percent over six years

* $10 per-shift fee for federally certified conductors

* Health care contributions growing from 1 percent of weekly wages in the first year of the contract to 2.25 percent in the sixth year

* No changes to pensions or work rules

 

April 2014

MTA's new proposal

* A five-year contract with raises totaling 11 percent

* Employees would contribute 2 percent of weekly wages toward health care costs

* A new wage progression schedule that would, in general, add two years to achieve top pay

* 5.2 percent employee contribution to pensions and a new final average earnings formula increased from three to five years; 10-year vesting (up from five), a new retirement formula, and new buyback rules.

 

June 2014

MTA's latest proposal

* Current workers would get raises totaling 17 percent over seven years.

* All workers would get an additional $10 per-shift fee.

* Current workers would contribute 2 percent of weekly wages to health benefit costs.

* New workers would contribute 4 percent to health costs.

* New workers would permanently pay 4 percent of pension costs (Most current workers only pay for the first 10 years.)

* Wage progression schedules for new workers would double.

 

July 2014

Unions' counteroffer. The unions have refused to disclose details of the plan but the MTA said on July 13 that the proposal:

* Extends to 10 years from five how long it takes workers to vest in their pensions

* Has new employees pay into their pensions longer, but at a smaller rate than the current 4 percent.

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