MINEOLA

Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano will light the dome of the Theodore Roosevelt Executive and Legislative Building red Monday night for the recognition of the American Heart Association’s National Wear Red Day, which is Friday.

The day supports events throughout the area to draw attention to the dangers associated with cardiovascular disease, the number 1 killer of women.

“It is imperative that the message be reiterated time and again that cardiovascular disease kills, and women are the primary victims. Women account for approximately 61 percent of all stroke deaths annually and heart disease is the number one killer of women age 25 and older,” said Mangano. “We need to make every effort we can to turn these statistics around, and that can only be done through research and education.”

Mangano, who said health and fitness is a priority of his administration, said the AHA’s Go Red For Women campaign urges women to take charge of their health.

County employees are encouraged to wear red on February 5th, and to make a donation of $5 or more to support research that helps ensure women are represented in clinical studies.

Additional information about National Wear Red Day and Go Red For Women is available by calling 1-888-694-3278 or visiting www.GoRedForWomen.org

SID CASSESE

MINEOLA

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The Moreano World Medical Mission will be hosting its annual fundraiser this Thursday, February 4th at the Davenport Press in Mineola to help outfit dozens of Long Island doctors and staff with much needed surgical supplies for its upcoming February medical mission to the Dominican Republic.

Dr. Edwin Moreano, a plastic surgeon from Bayville, has been making these trips, mostly to the Central America area for almost 20 years, and this is the first trip to Santo Domingo and the first to give away thousands of eyeglasses to needy children.

Dr. Dean Hart, one of the donors and founder of locally based Woodbury Optical, will be leading the ocular portion of the expedition and will be fitting thousands of underprivileged children and seniors with new eyeglasses from his practice.

“It’s an honor to give back to the global community and to help give the gift of sight to so many of those who truly need it,” said Hart. “It’s amazing to see so many doctors and volunteers from different fields and backgrounds selflessly pay their own way and give back to those they’ve never met.”

Much of the medical and surgical supplies for the mission are donated and transported by local doctors, as well as Dr. Edwin Moreano and the Melville based distribution company Henry Schein.

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Thursday’s $75-a-plate event is from 6 to 9 p.m. For more information or to be a surgery or event donor, call 917-575-8770, or go to dgugerty@optonline.net.

SID CASSESE

NORTH HEMPSTEAD

Dogs and cats can get microchipped for free at the town of North Hempstead’s second clinic in February.

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Microchips tag pets with a permanent electronic identification number, which can help return pets to their owners in the case of loss or theft.

At the upcoming clinic, microchips will be implanted by a licensed veterinarian or veterinary technician.

Town Supervisor Judi Bosworth said microchipping is a great benefit for pet owners. “This free service will give them the peace of mind that if their pet is ever lost, they will still be able to identify them,” Bosworth added.

Residents must reserve a space by calling 311 or 516-869-6311. The event is on February 27, from 10 a.m. to noon at the town’s animal shelter, at 75 Marino Avenue, Port Washington. Valid licenses are required and cat owners must also show proof of a current rabies vaccination certificate.

CHRISTINE CHUNG

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NEW YORK STATE

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo has announced a series of outreach events across the state to encourage minority and women owned-businesses to take advantage of billions in state contracting opportunities for the LaGuardia Redevelopment Project.

“New York continues to lead the nation in expanding opportunity for minority and women-owned businesses, and this project is no exception,” Cuomo said in a press release.

Since December, the state has hosted three outreach events in Buffalo, Albany and New York City to ensure that the minority and women-owned business community is informed about the opportunities presented by the LaGuardia Project.

The next event that is open for registration will take place in New York City on Thursday, February 11th and will provide attendees with an overview of contracting opportunities related to the project as well as information on bonding and vendor pre-qualification requirements.

To register for this event, visit: http://www.panynj.gov/events/mwbe-forum-nyc-2016/index.cfm.

Invitations for each outreach event are automatically sent to certified businesses listed in both Empire State Development and Port Authority’s online directories, business associations, and other stakeholders.

Anyone interested in learning more about contracting opportunities associated with the LaGuardia Project should register and attend an outreach event.

Managed by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, LaGuardia Airport is undergoing an extensive, multi-year capital redevelopment resulting in billions of dollars in contracting opportunities. Upon completion, the airport will be transformed into a single terminal with expanded transportation access, significantly increased taxiway space, and improved passenger amenities.

Since 2011, the state has certified more than 4,300 minority and women-owned businesses and recertified more than 3,600 others. During his 2014 State of the State address, Cuomo pledged to increase certification by an additional 2,000 businesses, a goal that the state exceeded earlier this month. As a result, the number of state-certified firms has more than doubled in just five years.

Additional information is available at www.governor.ny.gov

SID CASSESE

EAST HAMPTON VILLAGE

A $90,000 renovation of the East Hampton Village Police Station jail’s holding and interview area is being planned, with work expected to begin in the spring.

The plan – approved last month by the village board of trustees - includes new concrete block walls, floor resurfacing, renovation of the ceiling tiles, lighting improvements, and the addition of thick Plexiglas panels in the holding area to improve the security of both the detainees and employees.

“It doesn’t really affect the cells at all,” Police Chief Gerry Larsen said of the project in a telephone interview Monday. “It really affects more of the processing area where the officers interact with the prisoners. It’s kind of dated and there are officer safety concerns.”

He that currently prisoners are in too close a proximity to the officers. There are three male cells and one for females at the facility.

Village Engineer Drew Bennett said in a telephone interview that the village’s insurance carrier made a recommendation to make changes that will prevent the possibility of liability for village employees and detainees.

The police department and jail is located in the East Hampton Emergency Services Building on Cedar Street.

LISA IRIZARRY

EAST END

Former Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst and former Suffolk County Planning Commission Chairman David Calone will face off in their first debate Wednesday night as they seek the Democratic nomination for Congress.

Throne-Holst and Calone are vying to challenge freshman Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-Shirley) in New York’s 1st Congressional District on eastern Long Island.

The East Hampton Democratic Committee is hosting the debate, scheduled to begin at 7 p.m. at St. Michael’s Lutheran Church in Amagansett.

Calone, a former federal prosecutor from Setauket, left the planning commission last month after serving as its chairman since 2008. He is chief executive of the venture capital firm Jove Equity Partners LLC.

Throne-Holst, of Sag Harbor, led Southampton Town for six years, but declined to seek a fourth term last year as she mounted her bid for the Democratic nomination. An Independence Party member aligned with Democrats for much of her political career, she switched her registration last year to Democrat.

Charles Hitchcock, former East Hampton Democratic Committee chairman and Southampton College dean, is to moderate the debate.

Whoever wins the June 28 primary will challenge Zeldin, an Iraq war veteran and former state senator who has emerged as a prominent GOP spokesman on foreign affairs issues since he defeated then-Rep. Tim Bishop (D-Southampton) in 2014.

The 1st Congressional District, which stretches from Montauk and Orient in the east to Patchogue and Smithtown in the west, has been highly competitive in recent elections. Republicans have a registration edge, with 159,736 registered voters to Democrats’ 143,178, according to the state Board of Elections.

WILL JAMES

SAG HARBOR

The Sag Harbor Cinema, a single-screen Art Deco theater that has been a Main Street mainstay since it was built in the 1930s, is on the market for $14 million.

The owner, Gerald Mallow, who bought the theater in 1978 and runs it as a 400-seat art house cinema, has found upkeep on the older building challenging, says listing agent Ed Bruehl of Saunders & Associates. Mallow had offered the building for sale in 2008, according to published reports at the time, but this is the first time it’s officially on the market with an agent, Bruehl says

“He loves the space, he loves the movies, but he thinks it’s time for someone else to turn it back on and give it another life,” Bruehl says.

Bruehl says the 7,000-square-foot structure likely would have to come down and be rebuilt, with zoning laws allowing a three-story, 21,000-square-foot structure. Zoning laws also require that the iconic neon Sag Harbor sign must remain.

“My desire would be for someone to tear the building down and have the face of the building rebuilt exactly the same way but built better and stronger,” says Mallow, adding, “I don’t want the face of Sag Harbor to change.”

It’s been a difficult time for single-screen movie theaters, with Manhattan’s Ziegfeld Theater closing recently to make way for an event space. Bruehl says there has been interest in keeping the theater element, and adding dining.

LISA CHAMOFF