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Sean Pilger, of Hamlet Organic Garden in Brookhaven, (Credit: Chris Ware)

Sean Pilger, of Hamlet Organic Garden in Brookhaven, updates their Community Supported Agriculture board of the days available produce. Community Supported Agriculture - or CSAs - are the backbone of many farms on the East End. Families pay a lump sum to the farm before the season begins, helping to defray the costs. Throughout the season, CSA members can then make weekly pickups. (June 29, 2012)

Long Island's new farmers

A look at some of Long Island's new farmers.

Tom Hart, of Deep Roots Farm in Orient,
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(Credit: Chris Ware)

Tom Hart, of Deep Roots Farm in Orient, tends to one of his hogs. Hart, a roofer by trade, is one of several new farmers on the East End who left behind a career to become a farmer. (Oct. 24, 2012)

Sean Pilger, left, and Dan Machin, of Hamlet
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(Credit: Chris Ware)

Sean Pilger, left, and Dan Machin, of Hamlet Organic Garden in Brookhaven, are shown at the beginning of the farming season preparing to plant their first crops. (March 29, 2012)

Taylor Knapp, chef at First and South restaurant
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(Credit: Chris Ware)

Taylor Knapp, chef at First and South restaurant in Greenport, plates a fish during the dinner rush. Knapp purchases much of is inventory from local farmers. (Aug. 9, 2012)

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Hal Goodale comes from a family of farmers,
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(Credit: Chris Ware)

Hal Goodale comes from a family of farmers, but the open spaces of Long Island didn't initially appeal to him. He owned and operated a custom window and door business before walking away and starting his own dairy farm four years ago. (May 29, 2012)

Emily Landeck, of Sylvester Manor farm in Shelter
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(Credit: Chris Ware)

Emily Landeck, of Sylvester Manor farm in Shelter Island, helps prepare the farm for the planting of crops. (April 18, 2012)

Sean Pilger, of Hamlet Organic Garden in Brookhaven,
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(Credit: Chris Ware)

Sean Pilger, of Hamlet Organic Garden in Brookhaven, updates their Community Supported Agriculture board of the days available produce. Community Supported Agriculture - or CSAs - are the backbone of many farms on the East End. Families pay a lump sum to the farm before the season begins, helping to defray the costs. Throughout the season, CSA members can then make weekly pickups. (June 29, 2012)

Farming on the east end of Long Island
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(Credit: Chris Ware)

Farming on the east end of Long Island has historically been a significant part of the Island's commerce. Recently, a small group of new farmers are joining the trade. Some start immediately after college, while others are changing careers to take on the challenges of farming. (Aug. 16, 2012)

A worker on Hal Goodale's farm in Riverhead
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(Credit: Chris Ware)

A worker on Hal Goodale's farm in Riverhead tends to the cattle. (May 29, 2012)

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Hal Goodale, left, of Goodale Farms in Riverhead,
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Hal Goodale, left, of Goodale Farms in Riverhead, is shown at his dairy farm helping one of his employees shave a goat in the summer. (May 29, 2012)

A goat like this one at Hal Goodale's
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(Credit: Chris Ware)

A goat like this one at Hal Goodale's dairy farm will produce milk and cheese to consumers on the East End. (May 29, 2012)

Hal Goodale sells a variety of products at
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Hal Goodale sells a variety of products at his dairy farm in Riverhead. Among them are goat and cow cheeses, fresh milk and some produce. (Oct. 23, 2012)

The Peconic Land Trust is a non-profit organization
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(Credit: Chris Ware)

The Peconic Land Trust is a non-profit organization started in 1983 that protects more than 10,000 acres of land, including numerous farms. Under its Farms for the Future initiative, the land trust leases land to new farmers. (Oct. 18, 2012)

For many of the new farmers of the
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For many of the new farmers of the East End, growing locally sustainable food is as much a lifestyle as it is a career. (May 29, 2012)

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Hamlet Organic Garden farmers discuss a recent harvest
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(Credit: Chris Ware)

Hamlet Organic Garden farmers discuss a recent harvest during their work day. (June 29, 2012)

Dan Machin of Hamlet Organic Garden in Brookhaven,
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Dan Machin of Hamlet Organic Garden in Brookhaven, is shown at the beginning of the farming season watering crops in HOG's green house. (March 29, 2012)

Farming on the east end of Long Island
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(Credit: Chris Ware)

Farming on the east end of Long Island has historically been a significant part of the Island commerce. Recently, a small group of new farmers are joining the trade. Some start immediately after college, while others are changing careers to take on the challenges of farming. (April 18, 2012)

Sean Pilger, of Hamlet Organic Garden in Brookhaven,
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(Credit: Chris Ware)

Sean Pilger, of Hamlet Organic Garden in Brookhaven, walks fresh produce to their truck, which will be collected by their Community Supported Agriculture members. (June 29, 2012)

Emily Landeck, left, and Cassie Woolhiser, both of
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Emily Landeck, left, and Cassie Woolhiser, both of Sylvester Manor farm in Shelter Island, deliver fresh produce to First and South restaurant in Greenport. Landeck and Woolhiser met while studying at the University at Puget Sound. Neither studied agriculture, but both relocated to Long Island for the opportunity to work at Sylvester Manor. (Aug. 9, 2012)

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A CSA member leaves the Hamlet Organic Garden
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(Credit: Chris Ware)

A CSA member leaves the Hamlet Organic Garden with fresh produce that he purchased by making a lump sum payment to the farm before the season. (June 29, 2012)

Out on the east end of Long Island
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(Credit: Chris Ware)

Out on the east end of Long Island where suburbia gives way to open spaces, a new breed of farmer is taking root. They face many obstacles - land is scarce and expensive; the work is hard; and the financial rewards are few. Yet, despite the long odds against developing a profitable farm, they remain undeterred. (June 21, 2012)

Development on the East End has encroached on
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Development on the East End has encroached on many of the Island's open spaces, but thanks to the Peconic Land Trust, valuable land is being preserved for farming. (June 6, 2012)

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