Syosset school officials yesterday announced results of a close race in which one candidate won by a single vote, while a Suffolk County school district says it will hold a runoff election to fill a third open seat on its board of education.

In Syosset, where Tuesday's initial count ended in a tie, incumbent Christopher Di Filippo won a second term with 1,458 votes, compared with challenger Bill Weiner, who had 1,457 votes after affidavit ballots were counted.

Also Tuesday, elected to three-year terms were incumbent Joshua Lafazan with 1,848 votes and challenger Andrew Feldman, who had 1,514 votes. They had defeated challengers Seth Hart and Dale D. Predmore.

ExploreResults for the 2015 LI school elections

Di Filippo, 61, a Syosset resident for 33 years and the father of an 11th-grader in the high school, is an information technology project manager. He has said the board should examine the school district's academic and sports offerings -- and make sure its 60-year-old buildings are safe and efficient.

Yesterday, Di Filippo called his narrow win "a miracle" and said "it was meant to happen."

Weiner, 52, an 11-year resident of Syosset, is a senior technology manager with Standard & Poor's Ratings Services. Weiner said the school district should limit the amount of time devoted to preparing students for Common Core-based tests.

Syosset's Board of Education held a special meeting at 5:30 p.m. yesterday at South Woods Middle School to declare the results of the voting, including affidavit ballots.

In Longwood, incumbents William K. Miller and Maureen E. Silvestri each received 1,353 votes, and the runoff election will determine which of them wins the third seat, according to the district's website. A date was not posted.

Miller, 67, who has lived in the district for 42 years, is a commercial banker who has served on the school board for 24 years. He has said the most important issue facing the district is the role of career and technical education.

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Silvestri, 72, a homemaker, is a 24-year member of the school board and chairs its safety committee. She has said she believes the state-imposed tax cap "has given us the challenge of providing a first-rate education at a price we can afford."

Voters in Longwood on Tuesday elected incumbent Daniel Tomaszewski with 1,437 votes and Penelope Blizzard-McGrath with 1,489 votes for three-year terms. Challenger Victoria Molloy, who got 1,348 votes, was defeated.