The Federal Emergency Management Agency has approved South Nassau Communities Hospital’s plan to spend about $170 million — much of it in federal aid — on medical-facility improvements in Oceanside and Long Beach.

South Nassau submitted the proposal in February to spend $130 million to construct a four-story addition to its hospital in Oceanside, and use the remaining $40 million to build a permanent emergency room and medical arts center at the site of the former hospital in Long Beach.

On Tuesday, South Nassau spokesman Joe Calderone said the hospital received FEMA approval for use of the funds on Sept. 29.

The hospital still needs approval by the New York State Board of Health for both sites in Long Beach and Oceanside, in addition to zoning approvals by the Town of Hempstead and Long Beach. Both projects are expected to be completed by 2020.

FEMA approved an environmental-impact assessment for the projects earlier this year.

The funding from FEMA and the state was awarded in 2014, two years after superstorm Sandy heavily damaged the now-shuttered Long Beach Medical Center. South Nassau took control of the facility in 2014, after the Long Beach hospital declared bankruptcy.

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The hospital opened a standalone 911-receiving emergency room last year, which has treated more than 10,000 patients, hospital officials said, with about 90 percent of those treated on site.

Hospital officials said the expansion in Oceanside would be able to serve nearly 1 million South Shore residents, including those in Long Beach, and will include additional emergency space, intensive care rooms and operating rooms.

“This is an investment that will benefit Long Beach, Oceanside and the entire South Shore,” South Nassau President Richard J. Murphy said in a written statement. “The Southwest Addition to the hospital and the Medical Arts Pavilion in Long Beach will go a long way toward addressing the South Shore’s future medical needs, while restoring services that were lost as a result of Sandy and fortifying against another storm.”

The three-story Long Beach medical arts pavilion will include the permanent home of the emergency room, as well as a family medicine practice and services including dialysis, geriatric care and X-rays and diagnostic imaging.

Two buildings at the current Medical Center site facing Reynolds Channel will be stripped down and rebuilt, with the option to expand to a fourth floor if needed for additional specialty health care. Three other buildings at the Long Beach campus were demolished after flooding by Sandy.