When Dorothy Sellers picked up her mail on Friday afternoon, she didn’t think much of an envelope that appeared to be from Hillary Clinton’s campaign.

Perhaps it was just more election material, she thought — until she opened it.

“It was just a very nice letter,” Sellers, 103, of Freeport, said. “I’m sure it was PR, but it was very nice and rather personal.”

On her letterhead, Clinton wrote Sellers a note thanking her for her vote, which she said she read about in a Nov. 5 feature in the New York Daily News.

“Thank you, from the bottom of my heart, for voting for me for president,” Clinton wrote.

“We may not have shattered that highest, hardest glass ceiling this time, but someday someone will,” Clinton continued. “When it happens, I will think of you and my own mother, Dorothy [Rodham].”

advertisement | advertise on newsday

Clinton signed the letter in blue ink.

Sellers was born before the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote in 1921. She’s voted in every presidential election since Herbert Hoover won in 1928 and for many years, was a hard line Republican.

Sellers said it wasn’t even a close call for her this year.

“I thought the party changed and now I’m an independent,” she said. As for voting for Clinton, “I certainly had no choice, the other choice was not possible. I think she’s suited to the position.”

A representative from Clinton’s campaign did not respond to a request for comment.

Sellers said it’s not the first time she’s received letters from someone in power.

“When I turned 100, I got letters from people like Obama and Bloomberg and the mayor of Freeport, so I’ve had quite a few letters,” she said.

However, the one from Clinton was especially meaningful for Sellers and she appreciates the attention it’s gotten her the past few days. It’s a bright spot for her after her candidate’s loss and she’s confident there are better days ahead.

“I hope we can overcome all the negative stuff,” she said. “We’ve gotten over some crises before and I think we can do it again — we’re not licked yet.”