The mother of Eugérie André Narcisse felt that something was wrong when her house phone rang in Roosevelt and the caller ID said "Yale," where her son was a popular sophomore.

She couldn't imagine how right she would be that Sunday afternoon.

>>VIDEO: Click here to see former teacher remember deceased Yale student

That call Jasmine Narcisse answered Nov. 1 delivered the news: Her 19-year-old son had been found dead in his dorm.

"Twenty years of life, of love, of struggle," his mother said, nursing a cup of ginger tea earlier this week. "Suddenly, without any warning," she said, "we're having to face the fact that all this is over."

>>PHOTOS: Roosevelt teen found dead at Yale

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Her son would have turned 20 five days after his death.

An investigator for Connecticut's medical examiner said Wednesday that finding what killed Narcisse could take weeks as the office awaits toxicology and other tests. The investigator said while autopsies sometimes reveal tentative causes of death, the office waits to arrive at a definitive conclusion before making anything public. Authorities have said no foul play is suspected.

Not knowing what killed their son - a seemingly healthy, athletic teenager who was a varsity high school wrestler and a karate brown belt - has added to the hurt.

"We're living for that right now. Everything is in a state of limbo," she said. "The family will not have rest until we know."

The parents were hoping to tell their daughter, Iriane, 17, a senior at their son's alma mater, Phillips Exeter Academy, in person; instead, the news made its way to her before they could because Yale sent out a campuswide e-mail. A friend of Iriane's saw the e-mail and told her.

The family attended a candlelight vigil and the young man's friends and classmates offered condolences. At Narcisse's funeral in Merrick on Nov. 7, classmates came from Yale, Exeter, Uniondale High School and beyond.

"So, so many," his father, Jean-Pierre said.

On Narcisse's Facebook page, where hundreds have posted condolences, his family clicked on picture after picture of their son in happy days - eating lobster with friends, at the prom in a tux with a big smile, excelling at a science competition.

Narcisse, the son of Haitians - his mother, Jasmine, 49, is a college teacher pursuing a doctorate and his father, Jean-Pierre, 48, works for MTA Long Island - was born in Queens but spent the first nine years of life in Haiti.

When the family moved back to the United States, he attended public school in Uniondale, but his family wanted a more challenging education. So Narcisse, a straight-A student and science star at Uniondale, applied for and was accepted on scholarship to Exeter, the New Hampshire boarding school.

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Four months ago, the family moved to their current home in Roosevelt.

"I'm yet to accept the fact that he's not there," his mother said. "I feel him all around. . . . Maybe that's just a way of coping."

>>PHOTOS: Roosevelt teen found dead at Yale