Nassau 2nd District: D. Partee, P. Sinclair, R. Troiano

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Conventional wisdom may not tell the whole story in the race for county legislator in Nassau's 2nd Legislative District, which includes parts of Hempstead, Westbury and Lakeview.

The district's voter registration, in which Democrats outnumber Republicans by more than three to one, should give the advantage to North Hempstead Town Board member Robert Troiano, who won the Democratic primary over longtime incumbent Legis. Roger Corbin after Corbin was charged with federal tax evasion.

But another Democrat is in the race - community activist Pablo Sinclair - who is running on the independent People First ballot line.

A split in the Democratic vote could provide an opening for Republican/Conservative candidate Derek Partee, a retired Nassau County homicide detective.

All three promise to bring better services and more jobs to the district's predominantly minority communities.

Troiano, 56, of Westbury, six years ago was the first African-American elected to the town board.

He served 10 years on the Westbury school board, including six as president. A Brown University graduate with an MBA from Stanford University,

Troiano spent 25 years on Wall Street before becoming executive director of local Project Grad, an organization that helps improve graduation rates in poor communities. He is now regional coordinator for State Senate Majority Leader Malcolm Smith. He is married and has three children.

Partee, 57, of Hempstead, retired from the county police force two years ago after 25 years working in the community. A graduate of Southern University in Baton Rouge, La., with a master's in public administration from C.W. Post Campus of Long Island University, Partee said he will give back his legislative salary of $39,500 and hire interns from the district. He is married and has three children.

Sinclair, 36, of Westbury, is president of the Westbury Hills Civic Association and was deputy communications director for the Obama campaign on Long Island. A graduate of John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Sinclair is pursuing a master's in public administration at C.W. Post.

A Verizon manager, Sinclair was knocked off the Democratic primary ballot because of the lack of valid signatures on his petitions - even though the person who filed objections to his petitions did not have the legal right to file a complaint. He is married with four children.

Troiano said he his proud of "being instrumental" in the development of a $25-million community center in New Cassel and reconstruction of Prospect Avenue.

Partee said he wants to repeal the county's recently approved 2.5 percent home energy tax and support economic development in the district's villages.

Sinclair said he wants to increase job training in the district and crack down on illegal housing, which he said is a big problem that increases school taxes.

Sinclair said, "I think I could bring light to it from a different perspective as an immigrant myself."

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