ALBANY -- Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano said Monday he opposes State Senate Republicans' move to eliminate authorization for school-zone speed cameras on Long Island.

Nassau and Suffolk counties dropped the speed camera program last fall, after a vocal backlash. Not content with that, the GOP-led Senate, which faced criticism about speed cameras, has proposed withdrawing state authorization. That would block the counties from reviving the initiative.

Mangano said the legislature shouldn't go that far.

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"I think it should stay there for further discussion," Mangano said after a photo opportunity with Nassau's Assembly GOP delegation. "Clearly, with the amount of violations, there's a real compliance issue there."

Newsday has reported that over a period of about three months in 2014, 46,570 tickets were generated by Nassau's school-zone speed cameras to people exceeding the speed limit by more than 21 mph.

The Democrat-led Assembly has balked at the Senate proposal, saying it needs more information before it could consider killing the speed camera authorization.

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"We, in the Assembly, are asking the Nassau County Legislature to provide an opinion on this provision as soon as possible," the five Democrats in Nassau's Assembly delegation wrote in a letter Monday to county legislature Presiding Officer Norma Gonsalves (R-East Meadow).

"The school-zone cameras became law because this was requested by the Nassau County Legislature in a home rule message," the Assembly members wrote. "It is therefore fitting that your view on the Senate proposal is considered now."

A Gonsalves spokeswoman didn't immediately return a call for comment.

Last week, a spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos (R-Rockville Centre) said withdrawing authorization for speed cameras was "appropriate," given the counties' repeal.

A spokeswoman has said Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone has no objections to the Senate bill given that the county will not roll out the program.

Mangano said he was in Albany to appeal for state aid for an outfall pipe for the Bay Park Sewage Treatment Plant, which was damaged in superstorm Sandy.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has denied requests for the $550 million ocean outfall pipe because it did not exist at the time of the storm.