Democrat Madeline Singas and Republican Kate Murray are scheduled to face off in their first televised debate in the Nassau County district attorney's race, which airs live at 7 p.m. Wednesday night on News 12 Long Island.

The following are topics the candidates likely will raise as they make their case to voters during the 30-minute debate.

MADELINE SINGAS

See alsoWatch the debate live

Democrat, acting Nassau district attorney

1. Experience: Singas has worked as a prosecutor for 24 years, and says Murray is unqualified for district attorney because she's never practiced.

2. Public corruption: In the wake of the arrest of state Sen. Dean Skelos (R-Rockville Centre) on federal corruption charges, Singas has launched investigations into Nassau's awarding of contracts to politically connected vendors and issued a report calling for reforms of the process.

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3. Name recognition: Singas is aware that voters may be more familiar with Murray, the longtime Hempstead Town supervisor, so she may talk about her background as the daughter of Greek immigrants who did not speak English when they came to the United States.

KATE MURRAY

Republican, Hempstead Town supervisor

1. Domestic violence: In a TV campaign ad and in news media interviews, Murray has criticized Singas' handling of a 2006 domestic violence case. Domestic violence is an important issue for both candidates. Singas has spent the bulk of her career as a special victims prosecutor, and Murray served as a domestic violence victims advocate in 1988 during a law school internship.

2. Police union endorsements: Murray is endorsed by more than 25 law enforcement unions representing officers in Nassau, Suffolk, New York City and other jurisdictions. Expect Murray to highlight their support.

3. Heroin abuse: On the campaign trail, Murray has criticized Singas for what she said was not doing enough to curb heroin abuse in Nassau. Murray has called for the formation of a countywide heroin abuse task force. Singas says that's unnecessary, pointing to an existing county panel.