The Oyster Bay Town Board Tuesday approved spending nearly $432,000 more on finding out why the Hicksville parking garage continues to have structural problems — and designing fixes.

The 1,440-space, $35-million garage near the Hicksville Long Island Rail Road station has been problem-plagued since shortly after it opened in 2011. Problems include ceilings cracking, concrete falling onto cars, water leaking and elevators frequently out of service.

Workers in March installed metal posts called screw jacks to help support the ceilings of the two below-ground levels of the four-floor garage. Some of the money approved Tuesday is for that work.

Nearly $300,000 of the newly approved money will primarily go to designing repairs to the garage, with some used for additional structural analysis, Town Public Works Commissioner Richard Lenz said.

Some of the money also will be used for an outside company to undertake a “peer review” of work performed by Jericho-based Hirani Engineering & Land Surveying and Mineola-based Future Tech Consultants. Town officials in March approved paying Hirani, the contractor, and Future Tech, a subcontractor, $52,100 to investigate the causes of the cracking, test the concrete used in the garage and other work.

“It is taking a little bit of time, but I think we want to make sure that we’re doing everything right,” Lenz said. “We’ve done a lot of research.”

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The earlier testing ensured that the garage is safe for continued use, he said.

Oyster Bay officials last month sued two contractors that worked on the original construction of the garage — Freeport-based Peter Scalamandre & Sons Inc. and Mineola-based Sidney B. Bowne & Son LLP — alleging they failed to correct substandard work. The town is seeking unspecified damages for alleged breach of contract by both firms and alleged malpractice by Bowne.

A Scalamandre spokesman said last month the garage “was built according to specification.” Frank Antetomaso, speaking for Bowne at the time, said in an email last month that the company is “confident that there were absolutely no departures from good and accepted engineering practices.”