Police: Man posed as cop to write bad checks

Brian Harrington, 31, of Glendale, who police said Brian Harrington, 31, of Glendale, who police said impersonated a police officer to write bad checks for purchases at Long Island jewelry stores, was arrested in Elmont after a monthlong investigation. He was charged with second-degree weapons possession, two counts of third-degree criminal possession of a weapon, criminal impersonation of a police officer and two counts of issuing a bad check. (Sept. 11, 2013) Photo Credit: NCPD

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A Queens man who police said impersonated a police officer to write bad checks for purchases at Long Island jewelry stores was arrested Wednesday in Elmont after a monthlong investigation.

Brian Harrington, 31, of 7222 67th St., Glendale, was arrested by Nassau County police Bureau of Special Operations officers near the intersection of Healy Street and Oakley Avenue. He was charged with second-degree weapons possession, two counts of third-degree criminal possession of a weapon, criminal impersonation of a police officer and two counts of issuing a bad check. Harrington faces arraignment Thursday in First District Court in Hempstead.

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Police said that at about 1 p.m. Aug. 15, Harrington entered Rafael's Jewelry store on Peninsula Boulevard in Hewlett and told the owner he was a police officer. Police said Harrington then "showed the victim a badge" and requested to see a gold chain worth $2,965.45. Harrington told the owner he had lost his debit card and wanted to pay by check, police said. Police said Harrington then showed the owner his gun holster -- to "prove he was a police officer."

Harrington then purchased the chain using the check, which police said was written on a closed bank account.

At 4 p.m. the same day police said Harrington went to a jewelry dealer at the Tri-County Unique Bazaar on Hempstead Turnpike in Levittown where he purchased another gold chain -- worth $2,283.75 -- using another bad check from the closed account.

It was not immediately clear if the jewelry was recovered.

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