A retired Nassau County probation officer, who faced up to 6 1/2 years in prison on a child pornography charge, was sentenced Tuesday to the 8 days he had already served by a federal judge who cited numerous factors that called for a lesser sentence.

Gordon Woolf, 62, of Massapequa, who had been a probation officer for 30 years before he retired in 2010, was arrested by federal agents in 2013. Woolf was accused of accessing child pornography, and pleaded guilty in July to one count of downloading the child pornography between January 2012 and June 2013.

In court papers, Eastern District Assistant U.S. Attorney Allen Bode did not call for the maximum sentence but asked for "a significant jail term" because of the crime itself, and because, "as a probation officer, Woolf was a mandatory reporter for sexual abuse of children and he should have known better the damage caused by his conduct."

In sentencing Woolf, U.S. District Judge Sandra Feuerstein in Central Islip agreed with both the recommendation of the U.S. Probation Department and defense attorney Joseph Conway, who cited circumstances surrounding Woolf's conduct that called for a lenient sentence.

In court papers, Conway noted that his client had never been in trouble with the law. But Conway said that after Woolf retired he turned to downloading the pornography following a severe depression, the onset of prostate cancer aggravating his Crohn's disease, and having his home damaged by superstorm Sandy.

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In addition to the 8 days in jail Woolf served after his arrest, he also has been confined to home detention for 2 years.

While not giving him further jail time, Feuerstein also ordered Woolf to serve 5 years of supervised release, to register as a sex offender, to inform any future employee of his crime, to never download any child pornography and to allow probation officers to monitor his future computer use.

Before he was sentenced, Woolf told Feuerstein, "I am ashamed over my actions that led to my arrest. I realize the seriousness of the crimes I committed and I understand the effects on the victims of child pornography that are caused by people that view it like I did. . . . I went through a series of traumatic events . . . yet I realize that there are no valid reasons to justify my actions."

He added: "I spent 30 years at work dedicating my time to protecting the community and trying to help people under my supervision with their problems. I search for ways to recapture the self-esteem that I once felt."