Trustees of the Village of Upper Brookville are scheduled to vote Tuesday on whether to repeal a law allowing skeet shooting, a sport that some residents participated in when sprawling estates dotted the wealthy North Shore community.

Mayor Terry Thielen said skeet and trap shooting — both involve shooting clay targets in the air — are noisy and potentially dangerous in a village where many lot sizes are 2 acres and only a few 10-acre-plus estates remain.

She said there is no indication any residents have been skeet shooting within village boundaries in recent years but “we thought it would be something to get off the books, because it doesn’t belong.”

Current village law allows skeet and trap shooting between 9 a.m. and sunset by up to 12 people, as long as it doesn’t “endanger person or property”; a village permit is needed for groups of more than a dozen.

It’s unclear from when the provision originally dates, but it likely dated from an era decades ago when large estates were more common, Thielen said.

The mayor said officials didn’t realize skeet shooting was even legal until about two months ago, when “someone called up and asked if it’s allowed, and we thought, ‘No.’ We were surprised to see it’s still there [in the village code].”

Brett Moyes, director of the San Antonio-based National Sporting Clays Association, said it’s uncommon for a municipal code to have a direct reference to skeet shooting. Typically, the practice is covered under broader firearms regulations.

But Upper Brookville may be an exception because of its history of rambling estates, he said.

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“Back in the day, it was a wealthy man’s sport,” Moyes said of skeet shooting. “It wouldn’t be surprising with these large residences if those guys [from Upper Brookville]participated in it. That’s probably how it got written into the books.”

Moyes said if there have been no complaints about skeet shooting, the proposed ban appears to be unnecessary. Noise concerns could be addressed in broader noise laws, he said. Twelve-gauge shotguns’ range is up to 300 yards, so skeet-shooting is uncommon on all but larger properties, he said.

State law bars any discharge of a firearm within 500 feet of an occupied home, without the consent of the owner.

Several private clubs on Long Island offer skeet shooting, including the Matinecock Rod and Gun Club a few miles from Upper Brookville in Glen Cove. From October to April, members shoot biodegradable clay above Hempstead Harbor, said a club member who declined to identify himself.

Skeet and trap shooting is popular in rural parts of Long Island’s East End and eastern Brookhaven Town. Brookhaven has the Island’s two public skeet-shooting ranges.