Nassau’s top cop, Thomas C. Krumpter, underwent a procedure at a cardiac center to reopen blocked arteries and was released the next day, police officials said.

Krumpter was resting comfortably at his home Friday, officials said.

The acting police commissioner felt ill Thursday and went to the doctor, who advised him to go to St. Francis Hospital in Flower Hill, which has a cardiac center, authorities said.

Surgeons treated him for a blockage and put stents inside his arteries, authorities said.

The police statement said Krumpter’s family is requesting privacy.

“My thoughts are with Commissioner Krumpter and his family, and I pray for a speedy recovery,” said Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano.

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“I’m just hoping Tom makes a speedy recovery,” said Police Benevolent Association head James McDermott, who was at a retirement party Thursday night when he heard the news.

McDermott said police officials told him Krumpter, 50, had been feeling sick all week. “Eventually, he was feeling chest pains,” the union president said.

Late Thursday afternoon, Krumpter took his doctor’s advice to get it checked out quickly and went to the hospital, McDermott said.

It was unclear when Krumpter would return to work.

In 2016, he took part in a 300-mile police charity bicycle ride to Washington, D.C., and told Newsday he lost 70 pounds by exercising and cutting back on junk food.

Krumpter, who joined the force in 1992, was named acting commissioner in 2014 by Mangano and will reach his quarter-century mark as a Nassau police officer in July.

The son of a Nassau police sergeant, Krumpter as top cop has overseen the department during the county’s ongoing financial distress, including a controversial consolidation of precincts to save money.

Krumpter has led the 2,250-officer force during a period of historic crime lows.

He has sought to address some of the thorniest issues facing law enforcement recently, from a national wave of anti-police feelings to the surge in gang-related killings across Long Island. He frequently butted heads with the previous head of the police union on issues including body cameras for officers.

He also has kept a high profile as the department cracked down on criminal enterprises, including a heroin ring that operated up and down Route 110 in Suffolk.

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His investigators also followed a vehicle suspected of being the getaway car in several of the 18 knifepoint robberies across Long Island and nabbed three suspects just after they allegedly held up a Carvel in Huntington Station.

This year, Lloyd Harbor Village hired Krumpter as a consultant to “provide evaluation and recommendations” on the village police department’s operations.

With Zachary R. Dowdy and Mark Morales