Vaccine by injection or spray

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THE SHOT

How it works: Injects into the bloodstream parts of dead flu virus that prompts the body to create antibodies.

Who can use it:

Those 6 months of age and older, including healthy people and people with chronic medical condition.

Who can't:

Infants under 6 months

People with a severe allergy to chicken eggs; the vaccine is grown in eggs.

Those who have had a severe reaction to a flu vaccination in the past

People who developed Guillain-Barré syndrome, a rare autoimmune disorder affecting the nervous system, within 6 weeks of getting a flu vaccine previousl.

Possible side effects:

Soreness, redness or swelling where the shot was given

Low-grade fever

Aches

THE NASAL SPRAY

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How it works: Sprays into the nose live, genetically modified weakened virus. Starts immune response in the nose, where the virus enters and reproduce.

Who can use it:

Healthy people 2-49 years old who are not pregnant.

Who can't:

Pregnant women

Children under age 2

Adults over 49

Those with chronic medical conditions, including asthma or active wheezing.

Healthy people who care for those with severely weakened immune systems.

People with allergies to eggs; the vaccine is grown in egg.

Those who have had a past severe reaction to a flu vaccination.

People who developed Guillian-Barré syndrome within 6 weeks of getting a flu vaccine previously.

Why they can't: Seasonal flu nasal spray vaccine has been on the market since 2003, but hasn't been widely studied for use in some groups, such as pregnant women, older people and those with compromised immune systems. Clinical trials found an increased

incidence of wheezing and hospitalization in children under 2 who took the nasal spray vaccine.

Possible side effects:In children: Runny nose, wheezing, headache,

vomiting, muscle aches and fever.

In adults: Runny nose, headache, sore throat and cough.

 

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;

MedImmune; and the Food and Drug Administration.

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