There was nothing Vivian Farrell Logan loved more than the spotlight.

The West Babylon resident, who died Sept. 21, was known for her wide-ranging interests, but most of all she lived to perform, whether onstage or in front of a small group of children.

Logan had a massive stroke in January 2014 and spent her last months of declining health at East Neck Nursing Home. She was 85.

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During visits, "everywhere we went -- the bank, the post office -- people were like, 'Oh my God, Vivian!' " said Ronda Fein, who is married to Logan's nephew Lawrence Fein, of upstate Saratoga Springs. "People just know her for so many things."

Logan was born Oct. 30, 1929, in Manhattan Beach to Irving and Anna Fein. She received degrees in early childhood education from Syracuse University and educational theater from New York University, and moved to Lindenhurst in the 1950s.

Though she never had any children of her own, Logan loved them. She taught elementary school for a few years before attempting to break into show business and embraced her nieces, nephews and the stepchildren from her four marriages, Ronda Fein said.

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Logan could be eccentric, but she was always enthusiastic, friends and family said. To some, she was "the Bamboo Lady," for the Chinese-inspired oasis she built in her home's backyard in Lindenhurst. To others, she was better known for acting work in the early 1970s, when she had small roles in soap operas and plays.

"Many people say 'such-and-such had a full life,' and I think my aunt had multiple full lives," Lawrence Fein said. "She would get interested in something and go off on it."

She shared her joy in the form of musical performances for children. Neighbor Kathi Marchino said the neighborhood children, including her own, would flock to Logan's home, where she would perform stories and sing songs for them.

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"She was just a wonderful lady," said Marchino, who lived next door to Logan in Lindenhurst for two decades. "She got her joy out of teaching children."

Logan created shows that she performed around Long Island -- one inspired by the life of Amelia Earhart and another based on her book about the Fire Island Lighthouse, "Robert's Tall Friend."

Lawrence Fein said his aunt's story still inspires him and the patients he treats as an orthopedic surgeon -- Logan lost a leg in a car accident in the 1970s.

"She redirected her energies, but it didn't stop her from pursuing work and sports and dance and whatever she wanted," he said.

A funeral for Logan was held Saturday at Lindenhurst Funeral Home. Donations can be made in her name to the Fire Island Lighthouse Preservation Society at fireislandlighthouse.com.

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In addition to Lawrence and Ronda Fein, Logan is survived by her fourth husband, Charles Hoffmann, of St. Louis; brother Frederick Fein of Lantana, Florida; nephew Jason Fein of Hastings-on-Hudson; niece Pamela Zieden-Weber of Marlboro, New Jersey; and seven grandnieces and grandnephews.