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The 28th Annual Oyster Festival returns to the (Credit: Photo by Steve Pfost)

The 28th Annual Oyster Festival returns to the shores of Oyster Bay. Every year, more than 200,000 visitors flock to an Indian-summer weekend on the waterfront in downtown Oyster Bay drawn by live entertainment, tall ships, top-notch artisans, pirate shows, midway rides, and the iconic oyster eating and shucking contest.

Oyster Bay Festival

The 28th Annual Oyster Festival returns to the shores of Oyster Bay. Every year, more than 200,000 visitors flock to an Indian-summer weekend on the waterfront in downtown Oyster Bay, drawn by live entertainment, Tall Ships, top-notch artisans, pirate shows, midway rides, and the iconic oyster eating and shucking contest. And of course the Food Court, where volunteer chefs and culinary pros work side by side, cooking and serving dozens of unique oyster, clam and other seafood concoctions. (Oct. 15, 2011)

Prepared plates pile up and are ready to
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

Prepared plates pile up and are ready to be served to customers. (Oct. 15, 2011)

The crowds walk by oyster tents and contemplate
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

The crowds walk by oyster tents and contemplate the choices of oysters. (Oct. 15, 2011)

Eddie Chin, left, and Sue Chin, right, eat
(Credit: Photo by Steve Pfost)

Eddie Chin, left, and Sue Chin, right, eat their plate of oysters. The 28th Annual Oyster Festival returns to the shores of Oyster Bay. Every year, more than 200,000 visitors flock to an Indian-summer weekend on the waterfront in downtown Oyster Bay � drawn by live entertainment, Tall Ships, top-notch artisans, pirate shows, midway rides, and the iconic oyster eating and shucking contest. And of course�the Food Court, where volunteer chefs and culinary pros work side by side, cooking and serving dozens of unique oyster, clam and other seafood concoctions along with traditional festival fare. October 15, 2011 (Photo by Steve Pfost)

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Serge Nepo, right, of the Mill River Rod
(Credit: Photo by Steve Pfost)

Serge Nepo, right, of the Mill River Rod and Gun Club, fries oysters during the festival. The 28th Annual Oyster Festival returns to the shores of Oyster Bay. Every year, more than 200,000 visitors flock to an Indian-summer weekend on the waterfront in downtown Oyster Bay � drawn by live entertainment, Tall Ships, top-notch artisans, pirate shows, midway rides, and the iconic oyster eating and shucking contest. And of course�the Food Court, where volunteer chefs and culinary pros work side by side, cooking and serving dozens of unique oyster, clam and other seafood concoctions along with traditional festival fare. October 15, 2011 (Photo by Steve Pfost)

The 28th Annual Oyster Festival returns to the
(Credit: Photo by Steve Pfost)

The 28th Annual Oyster Festival returns to the shores of Oyster Bay. Every year, more than 200,000 visitors flock to an Indian-summer weekend on the waterfront in downtown Oyster Bay � drawn by live entertainment, Tall Ships, top-notch artisans, pirate shows, midway rides, and the iconic oyster eating and shucking contest. And of course�the Food Court, where volunteer chefs and culinary pros work side by side, cooking and serving dozens of unique oyster, clam and other seafood concoctions along with traditional festival fare. October 15, 2011 (Photo by Steve Pfost)

Marvin Bonilla, left, and Jouoni Pagodda, right prepare
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

Marvin Bonilla, left, and Jouoni Pagodda, right prepare oysters to be served. (Oct. 15, 2011)

An oyster is being sliced and opened so
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

An oyster is being sliced and opened so the event staff can serve them to visitors. (Oct. 15, 2011)

Event staff shuck oysters in order to prepare
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

Event staff shuck oysters in order to prepare them for people to buy and consume. (Oct. 15, 2011)

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Spectators watch while on line as staff shuck
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

Spectators watch while on line as staff shuck oysters. (Oct. 15, 2011)

Visitors sit and chat with the crew of
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

Visitors sit and chat with the crew of the Lynx, an 1812 styled ship harbored in the bay.

Event staff shuck oysters in order to prepare
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

Event staff shuck oysters in order to prepare them for people to buy and consume. (Oct. 15, 2011)

A few people consume raw, fresh oysters at
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

A few people consume raw, fresh oysters at the oyster tent. (Oct. 15, 2011)

The crowds flock to the oyster tent to
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

The crowds flock to the oyster tent to buy and consume fresh raw oysters. (Oct. 15, 2011)

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A man walks away ready to eat, with
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

A man walks away ready to eat, with three plates high from the oyster tent. (Oct. 15, 2011)

A few visitors enjoy the cuisine at the
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

A few visitors enjoy the cuisine at the Oyster Bay Festival. (Oct. 15, 2011)

Stanley Hochman, right, from Great Neck, laughs at
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

Stanley Hochman, right, from Great Neck, laughs at his girlfriend, Stacey Glazer, left, also of Great Neck as she eats a fresh raw oyster. (Oct. 15, 2011)

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