The race for two four-year seats on the Greenport Village Board of Trustees has three candidates running in the Tuesday election after a fourth dropped out.

Still in the race are incumbents Mary Bess Phillips and Julia Robins, and Greenport resident Paul Kreiling.

According to village board members, trustee candidate Lucy Clark, also known as Mary Given, had told them earlier this week that she had dropped out of the race. Attempts to contact Clark were unsuccessful. However, the village clerk’s office Wednesday reported four candidates are still on the ballots for the election.

Phillips, 61, a trustee since 2009, is seeking a third term on the board. A village resident since 1977, Phillips said one of the things she was proud of was working with the village clerk during her latest term on improving communications between the town government and the public through live streaming of board meetings on the village website.

“We’ve come a long way since 2009, when I first came on, as far as joining the technical age,” said Phillips.

Looking ahead, Phillips said she wants to focus on creating more affordable housing in the village and to make it available for young couples and senior residents. And, if re-elected, she said she would advocate for registering short-term rentals in the village of Greenport so they could be inspected for safety reasons.

Phillips cited as her biggest strength that “I always learn from the past.”

“I do a fair amount of research and then it’s taking it one step further to looking to the future of the village,” she said.

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Kreiling, 61, a Greenport resident and sailing school owner making his first bid for public office, said he wanted to run for village board in order to “put Greenport on the map as a very forward-thinking example of good management.”

With the local environment and the health of the village harbor waters among his biggest concerns, Kreiling said if elected, he would try to get the village to become more “environmentally forward thinking” in order to provide “real infrastructure solutions and remediate some of the issues that have come to the foreground.”

Among Kreiling’s other goals would be promoting an aggressive grant writing program for the village and pushing for more transparency between the village government and residents.

“I think people are interested, but it [village government] is a little opaque,” Kreiling said. “I’m not trying to make this whole thing a big deal, but I am trying to accelerate what we have and refine it.”

Robins, a real estate sales agent who is seeking a fourth term as trustee, did not respond to requests for comment.