Heidi Cruz, wife of GOP presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, stopped in Mineola Monday at the campaign’s first New York-based office to thank volunteers and rev them up before next week’s primary here.

“This election is about the people making our government work for us rather than the other way around, which it’s been for far too long,” Cruz told more than 100 supporters crammed into a volunteer and coordinating center along Old Country Road.

Cruz said her husband was courageous, principled and kind and that he would work to restore the private sector, protect constitutional liberties and keep America safe.

“We have one week to turn out New York State for Ted and it’s going to happen through you,” Cruz said. “We’ve won five states in a row, let’s make New York the sixth.”

The Mineola office, in the basement of the Lally & Misir law firm, opened April 4, and a second opened Thursday in Patchogue.

Delegate Tracker

Democratic Candidates

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2,382 needed for nomination

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“We want you to know you have our back, we have your back and we have Senator Cruz’s back,” said attorney Maureen Daly, who helped set up the office, which hosts about 20 volunteers daily making calls and going out to knock on doors. “We’re very proud to stand with you.”

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Asked if she was bothered by the senator’s negative use of “New York values,” Daly said supporters understood he was not talking about residents. “He was referring to the liberal politicians,” she said. “I know he loves New York. None of us took that seriously.”

Ariel Kohane, a Cruz campaign chairman for the 10th legislative district in New York City, which encompasses sections of lower Manhattan, Brooklyn and the Upper West Side, said he supports the senator because he is pro-Israel and will be strong on foreign policy, close the border to illegal immigration, support traditional marriage and protect religious liberties.

“It’s very exciting that we actually have a say in both primaries,” Kohane said. “Even though they say Trump is going to win New York State we can definitely keep Trump below 50 percent or knock him down a few points.”

Meanwhile, a handful of protesters stood across the street, urging people to vote against Cruz because he did not vote for the 2013 supplemental superstorm Sandy disaster relief bill. The $50 billion bill, which passed, authorized Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Housing and Urban Development and other agencies to fund response and resilience measures in areas hit by Sandy and tropical storms Irene and Lee.

“I’m saying no,” said Ron DeMarrais of Lynbrook, whose parents’ Freeport home was heavily damaged by the storm. “I don’t want to see people voting for Cruz. He voted against us getting aid and anyone else. He is not for New York at all.”

DeMarrais instead supports Trump. “I think we need a change,” he said of Washington. “The whole machine that is in right now is not doing us any good.”