Donald Trump accepted the endorsement and nomination Wednesday of the Conservative Party of New York State, touting himself to members gathered in midtown Manhattan as the race’s “real New Yorker” and the candidate who will win the blue state and the White House.

“Don’t forget: Hillary, she’s not a New Yorker,” the Republican nominee for president said of his Democratic rival at the New York Marriott Marquis hotel reception.

Trump noted that Clinton has deep roots in Arkansas and Illinois. The former secretary of state now resides in Westchester County and was formerly a U.S. senator representing New York.

Trump, a Manhattan-based real estate mogul, was born and raised in Queens.

“I’m the real New Yorker, folks,” he said to cheers from the hundreds assembled. “You will never get more of a New Yorker if you want a president, than you’re getting with me.”

Trump vowed he would redeliver New York State to GOP and conservative hands. He said he had witnessed economic despair across the state, including in Suffolk County.

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“I’ve been here all my life. I couldn’t believe it, the devastation that has happened in this state,” he said.

Trump reiterated a promise to keep companies in New York, in part by taxing those that leave the country.

“There’s no hope, there’s no hope, other than if I become president,” he said.

Trump told the story of his successful takeover in the 1980s of Central Park’s iconic Wollman Rink, an ice-skating facility that was behind schedule and over-budget under New York City control until he stepped in to complete the construction. He shared an anecdote about innovating ice so it would freeze properly.

“On a very, very large-scale version, we have to do the same for New York State,” he said.

State Conservative Party chairman Michael Long said Trump’s chances at the presidency are substantially improved with the party’s ballot line. He told reporters there is more to the state than Democrat-heavy New York City.

“It’ll be a clear signal to conservatives across the country,” Long said, adding of Trump, “He’s had his ups and downs with some of the conservatives, but I believe they’re all going to come home before Election Day.”

State Sen. Thomas Croci (R-Islip) at the event told Newsday, “Upstate and Suffolk County and Long Island are different — geographically and culturally — from the rest of the state, so this is a voice speaking for a lot of New Yorkers that ordinarily we wouldn’t have.”