Spin Cycle

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ALBANY - The relatives of an 11-year-old girl who died of an asthma attack after a police officer was unable to revive her were among the advocates and lobbyists desperately trying to push their bills in the waning days of the legislative session.

The bill would require police to receive training in potentially lifesaving cardiopulmonary resuscitation and retraining every two years. The Ojeda family was in Albany Tuesday and through much of the last four weeks to urge legislators to pass the bill.

Assemb. Felix Ortiz (D-Brooklyn) said talks are underway with Senate leaders to pass what Ortiz called Briana's Law, named for the girl who died in 2010. Briana Ojeda suffered a severe asthma attack and died after a police officer was unable to perform CPR.

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"We are working with the Senate today so the bill can become a law to save lives," Ortiz said Tuesday.

The American Red Cross supports the measure.