Spin Cycle

News, views and commentary on Long Island, state and national politics.

WASHINGTON — Voters in New York’s suburbs split almost evenly between Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump in a survey conducted last week, but Clinton still led Trump statewide by 12 points, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Tuesday.

Trump said he expects to put deeply blue New York State in play, but the battle between the two New Yorkers for their home state’s votes still looks like it belongs to the Democrat, the poll found.

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“As Republicans rally in Cleveland and Democrats prepare for their Philadelphia convention, Hillary Clinton seems to have her adopted home state votes safely locked up,” said Maurice Carroll, a Quinnipiac University Poll assistant director, in a statement.

The poll shows Clinton led Trump 47 percent to 35 percent in a survey of registered voters about the two parties’ presidential candidates.

Clinton owes her lead to her support in New York City, where 63 percent of those surveyed said they’d vote for her and 20 percent said they’d back Trump, the poll found.

In the suburbs, 40 percent said they are for Trump and 39 percent for Clinton. Upstate, Trump led 48 percent to 36 percent.

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The gender gap found in national polling on the two candidates also appeared in the Quinnipiac poll: Women favor Clinton 54 percent to 36 percent over Trump and men support Trump 44 percent to 40 percent over Clinton.

Both candidates have net negative favorability ratings, with 41 percent of those surveyed saying they had a favorable view of Clinton, and 52 percent saying they had a negative view of her, and 32 percent viewed Trump favorably, while 61 percent viewed him negatively.

When third-party candidates were added to the mix, Clinton led with 45 percent, Trump trailed with 33 percent, Libertarian Party candidate Gary Johnson had 6 percent and Green Party candidate Jill Stein, 4 percent.

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The survey of 1,104 New York voters by live interviewers on landlines and cellphones was conducted from Wednesday to Sunday and has a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.