Acting Nassau District Attorney Madeline Singas, a Democrat running against Republican Hempstead Town Supervisor Kate Murray for Nassau district attorney, has released her second TV ad of the campaign season -- taking aim at Murray’s legal experience while attempting to tie Murray to indicted State Sen. Dean Skelos (R-Rockville Centre).

The 30-second ad, which began airing Monday, shows snapshots of Murray standing alongside Skelos at public events. Skelos, who faces a November trial on federal corruption charges, has pleaded not guilty to using his influence to steer fees and jobs from private contractors to his son Adam while serving as Senate majority leader.

The ad starts with a snippet of a previous Murray campaign commercial where she states, “Ss a domestic violence advocate I will prosecute abusers and put them behind bars.”

A narrator then states: “Kate Murray’s experience on domestic violence? Serving as an intern once a week, 25 years ago. Her crime-fighting experience? None. A career politician, Murray has never practiced criminal law, never prosecuted a criminal case, not one.”

Murray previously served as a victims advocate in 1988 as part of the Suffolk University Battered Women's Advocacy Project, and also worked for the New York State attorney general’s office as an assistant state attorney.

Singas, who became acting district attorney in January following predecessor Kathleen Rice’s election to Congress, was the previous head of the Nassau DA’s special victims unit, which prosecutes domestic violence cases, and in 2000 established the special victims unit at the Queens district attorney’s office.

When asked to respond to Singas’s latest ad, Murray campaign spokesman Bill Corbett said “nothing will change the fact that Madeline Singas refused a judge’s order to prosecute an accused domestic abuser.”

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Corbett was referring to a case mentioned in an ad released by Murray’s campaign last week that questions Singas’ handling of a 2006 domestic violence case. At the time, Singas called for a judge to dismiss the case of a Syosset woman who alleged her husband threatened her life. Singas said the woman’s story was found not to be credible by investigators and the woman was attempting to manipulate the courts in order to win her divorce case.

While a judge ordered the case to trial, he later dismissed the charges against the estranged husband.

Singas in an interview last week defended her handling of the case. “We had evidence that crime was not committed in the way . . . that the woman had alleged that it happened,” Singas said. “As our ethical duty as prosecutors, I dismissed the case against that man.”