ALBANY — Democrat Hillary Clinton continued to keep her comfortable lead over Republican Donald Trump in New York State, according to a presidential race poll released Tuesday.

Clinton held a 51-30 percent lead over Trump in Tuesday’s Siena Research Institute poll. That compares with last month’s poll when Clinton held a 50-25 percent lead among registered voters.

The candidates are even among voters not enrolled in a political party, said Siena pollster Steven Greenberg. Independent voters will be a key target for the candidates in the Sept. 26 debate at Hofstra University.

Trump, a Manhattan developer, has promised to win his home state, where Democratic voters outnumber Republicans 2:1. That would be the first time a Republican presidential candidate has won New York since Ronald Reagan carried the state in his 1984 landslide victory.

The poll also showed 68 percent of voters had an unfavorable view of Trump in Tuesday’s poll. A month ago, 72 percent of New York voters saw him unfavorably.

Clinton, the former U.S. senator for New York and former first lady, was seen unfavorably by 46 percent of voters in Tuesday’s poll. That’s statistically unchanged from a month ago.

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Each candidate’s favorability rating continues to be affected by voters’ view of their trustworthiness: 58 percent of voters said Clinton isn’t trustworthy while 67 percent said Trump isn’t trustworthy.

Back in Albany, just months after former Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos (R-Rockville Centre) and former Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver (D-Manhattan) were convicted of corruption, the legislature, as a whole, recorded some of its most popular ratings ever as lawmakers run for re-election this year.

The Republican-controlled Senate led by Senate Majority Leader John Flanagan (R-East Northport) was viewed favorably by 48 percent of voters, its top mark in the Siena poll; while the Democrat-led Assembly was seen favorably by 44 percent of voters. That’s within 1 percentage point matching the Assembly’s highest mark.

The poll questioned 600 registered voters Sept. 11 to 15 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 5 percentage points.