The ex-mayor, crunch time, and that flip-flop thing

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Giuliani appears to be compensating for his earlier

Giuliani appears to be compensating for his earlier attacks on Mitt Romney. Photo Credit: Newsday/ Dan Janison

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Spin Cycle

News, views and commentary on Long Island, state and national politics.

In TV appearances, Republican Rudy Giuliani whacks President Barack Obama, from saying the Marines indeed use bayonets to escalating the criticism on Libya.

That's only fair. He might just owe Mitt Romney — after all the put-downs the ex-mayor threw in the GOP nominee’s direction just a few months ago, perhaps expecting the handsome, wealthy former Mass. governor to crash and burn as he did himself a few years earlier.

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America’s mayor said last December:

“There’s something wrong when you’ve been running as long as Mitt has and you’re at 25 percent, and you go don’t much above and you don’t go much below. Seventy-five percent of the other Republicans are telling you something about him.”

“I ran against him in ’07, ’08. I have never seen a guy – and I’ve run in a lot of elections, supported a lot of people, opposed them – never seen a guy change his positions on so many things, so fast, on a dime. Everything.”

Giuliani cited abortion, gun control, cap and trade, the health care mandate.

“He was pro-mandate for the whole country. Then he becomes anti-mandate and takes that page out of his book and republishes the book. I can go on and on. I mean, this is a total switch.”

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“Now what will Barack Obama do to that? What Barack Obama will do to that is: ‘This is a man without a core. This is a man without substance. This is a man who will say anything to become president of the United States. I think that is a great vulnerability.”

A few months later, Giuliani — whose positions on abortion and gun control also did some, uh, “evolving” between his time at City Hall and his ruined run for the White House — endorsed Romney for president.

The question is which of his international clients may stand to gain if Romney wins, and if the current kissing-up works.

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