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When their Babylon home was damaged by 2 (Credit: Newsday / John Paraskevas)

When their Babylon home was damaged by 2 feet of water after superstorm Sandy, the Albert family, from left to right, Philip, JoAnne and daughter Amanda, 16, decided they didn't want to go through that experience again, so they researched ways to minimize their exposure to risk in the future. Their house is now suspended in the air, waiting to be placed on a new concrete foundation, elevated 8 feet above the flood plain. The family is currently living in a small trailer at the side of the house. (Aug. 29, 2013)

Raising LI homes

The elevation and rebuilding of homes devastated by superstorm Sandy along Long Island's South Shore continues.

Mike Young and Anna Ervolina, with their children
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Mike Young and Anna Ervolina, with their children Mikey, 2, and Lauren, 4, stand in front of their Long Beach home which was destroyed in superstorm Sandy. (Aug. 15, 2013)

Patrick Dixon, the owner of what used to
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(Credit: Newsday / Jeffrey Basinger)

Patrick Dixon, the owner of what used to be a one-story house in Long Beach, walks to the front of his new three-story house with a cement first floor. Dixon is designing and building the house himself. (July 27, 2013)

When their Babylon home was damaged by 2
(Credit: Newsday / John Paraskevas)

When their Babylon home was damaged by 2 feet of water after superstorm Sandy, the Albert family, from left to right, Philip, JoAnne and daughter Amanda, 16, decided they didn't want to go through that experience again, so they researched ways to minimize their exposure to risk in the future. Their house is now suspended in the air, waiting to be placed on a new concrete foundation, elevated 8 feet above the flood plain. The family is currently living in a small trailer at the side of the house. (Aug. 29, 2013)

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When their Babylon home was damaged by 2
(Credit: Newsday / John Paraskevas)

When their Babylon home was damaged by 2 feet of water after superstorm Sandy, the Albert family, from left to right, Philip, JoAnne and daughter Amanda, 16, decided they didn't want to go through that experience again, so they researched ways to minimize their exposure to risk in the future. Their house is now suspended in the air, waiting to be placed on a new concrete foundation, elevated 8 feet above the flood plain. The family is currently living in a small trailer at the side of the house. (Aug. 29, 2013)

Christopher Wills gets ready to move back into
(Credit: Newsday / Alejandra Villa)

Christopher Wills gets ready to move back into his Babylon Village home. Wills raised the home after more than three feet of water flooded the property during superstorm Sandy. (Aug. 9, 2013)

Christopher Wills and his girlfriend, Kathy Fullam, get
(Credit: Newsday / Alejandra Villa)

Christopher Wills and his girlfriend, Kathy Fullam, get ready to move back into his canal-side home in Babylon Village with a view of Babylon Cove. Wills raised the home after more than 3 feet of water flooded the property and damaged it during superstorm Sandy. (Aug. 9, 2013)

Christopher Wills gets ready to move back into
(Credit: Newsday / Alejandra Villa)

Christopher Wills gets ready to move back into his Babylon home. Wills raised the home after more than 3 feet of water flooded the property and damaged it during superstorm Sandy. (Aug. 9, 2013)

Christopher Wills and his girlfriend, Kathy Fullam, get
(Credit: Newsday / Alejandra Villa)

Christopher Wills and his girlfriend, Kathy Fullam, get ready to move back into his canal-side home in Babylon Village. (Aug. 9, 2013)

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A demolished house on Tennessee Avenue in Long
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(Credit: Newsday / Jeffrey Basinger)

A demolished house on Tennessee Avenue in Long Beach. (July 27, 2013)

A Bayport house flooded during superstorm Sandy is
(Credit: Newsday / Ed Betz)

A Bayport house flooded during superstorm Sandy is being raised with the help of helical piles, which help support a home that rests on unstable soil. (April 11, 2013)

The owner of a Sandy-damaged house on Division
Buy photo
(Credit: Newsday / Jeffrey Basinger)

The owner of a Sandy-damaged house on Division Avenue in Massapequa talks on the phone while a crew works on the downstairs interior. (July 27, 2013).

The house is first jacked up and placed
(Credit: Newsday / Ed Betz)

The house is first jacked up and placed on wooden supports called cribbages. Then, the helical piles, which are metal and have a corkscrew-like shape, are driven into the boggy soil beneath the home. (April 11, 2013)

When bog or fill is found during testing
(Credit: Newsday / Ed Betz)

When bog or fill is found during testing of soil beneath a home that is to be raised, it increases the cost, which then must include piles -- either timber or helical piles like the ones being used at this Bayport home. (April 11, 2013)

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The typical course for raising homes is to
(Credit: Newsday / Ed Betz)

The typical course for raising homes is to erect a foundation that uses piles driven to precise bearing points below ground for more support, architects say. There are two main types: helical piles, which are metal and have a corkscrew-like configuration, or driven piles, also called timber piles, which are likened to telephone poles. Helical piles are being used at this Bayport home. (April 11, 2013)

This Bayport house is placed on wooden supports
(Credit: Newsday / Ed Betz)

This Bayport house is placed on wooden supports called cribbages so helical piles can be driven into the unstable soil beneath the home. (April 11, 2013)

Helical piles, part of a manufactured steel foundation
(Credit: Newsday / Ed Betz)

Helical piles, part of a manufactured steel foundation system comprising a central shaft with one or more helix-shaped bearing plates and a bracket that allows attachment to a structure, are installed at a Bayport house flooded during superstorm Sandy that is being raised. (April 11, 2013)

Bob Platin stands near his home where helical
(Credit: Newsday / Ed Betz)

Bob Platin stands near his home where helical piles were installed to raise the structure after it was flooded during superstorm Sandy. “It would be unwise to build a new foundation, an even heavier foundation,” he said, because “bog is unstable.” (April 11, 2013)

Grover Cleveland Siems III of Babylon is having
(Credit: Chris Ware)

Grover Cleveland Siems III of Babylon is having his home raised to protect it from future storms similar to superstorm Sandy. (Feb. 5, 2013)

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Grover Cleveland Siems III of Babylon, left, is
(Credit: Chris Ware)

Grover Cleveland Siems III of Babylon, left, is having his home raised to protect it from flooding. Before superstorm Sandy, his house already was on 4-foot pilings; after Sandy, he hired a company to raise it even higher, at a cost of about $30,000.

Leon Strobel, of Lindenhurst, stands with his Yorkshire
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

Leon Strobel, of Lindenhurst, stands with his Yorkshire Terrier, Miss Daisy, next to his home on South 5th Street that was raised after sustaining damage during Hurricane Gloria. (Feb. 14, 2013)

Leon Strobel, of Lindenhurst, stands with his Yorkshire
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

Leon Strobel, of Lindenhurst, stands with his Yorkshire Terrier, Miss Daisy, next to concrete pillars in the basement of his home on South 5th Street, which was raised after sustaining damage during Hurricane Gloria. (February 14, 2013)

A photo of the home of Susan Cullen
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

A photo of the home of Susan Cullen as it was being raised in 2007.

Susan Cullen, who raised her Lindenhurst home in
(Credit: Steve Pfost)

Susan Cullen, who raised her Lindenhurst home in 2007, looks into her basement where wood planks and stantions support the structure. (February 15, 2013)

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Guy Davis, owner of Davis Construction Building Movers,
(Credit: Randee Daddona)

Guy Davis, owner of Davis Construction Building Movers, works on raising the home of Aimee Whalen in East Quogue. (Feb. 15, 2013)

Guy Davis, owner of Davis Construction Building Movers,
(Credit: Randee Daddona)

Guy Davis, owner of Davis Construction Building Movers, works on raising the home of Aimee Whalen in East Quogue. Whalen's house flooded twice in two years: first from Tropical Storm Irene, then from superstorm Sandy. (Feb. 15, 2013)

Guy Davis, owner of Davis Construction Building Movers,
(Credit: Randee Daddona)

Guy Davis, owner of Davis Construction Building Movers, works on raising the home of Aimee Whalen in East Quogue.

Aimee Whalen is having her home in East
(Credit: Randee Daddona)

Aimee Whalen is having her home in East Quogue raised 5 feet to protect against flooding. (Feb. 5, 2013)

Aimee Whalen's home in East Quogue sits in
(Credit: Randee Daddona)

Aimee Whalen's home in East Quogue sits in wooden cribbing awaiting completion of a new foundation. (Feb. 5, 2013)

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Aimee Whalen is having her home in East
(Credit: Randee Daddona)

Aimee Whalen is having her home in East Quogue raised 5 feet. (Feb. 5, 2013)

Workers from Dawn House & Building Movers and
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Workers from Dawn House & Building Movers and True North Construction prepare to raise a house in Lindenhurst. (Jan. 23, 2013)

Stanley Kazel of Dawn House & Building Movers
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Stanley Kazel of Dawn House & Building Movers works with employees of True North Construction to raise a house in Lindenhurst. (Jan. 23, 2013)

Stanley Kazel of Dawn House & Building Movers
(Credit: Newsday / Thomas A. Ferrara)

Stanley Kazel of Dawn House & Building Movers works with employees of True North Construction to raise a home in Lindenhurst. (Jan. 23, 2013)

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